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Labor and Nuclear Power

Labor and Nuclear Power AFL-CIO and Nuclear Power In 1976 the AFLCIO conference on Nuclear Energy and America’s Energy Needs concluded that “rapid develop- ment of nuclear power is a ‘must’ with- out which the nation’s economy would falter .” Whenever anti-nuclear groups have obstructed specific projects or proposed state propositions to hinder nuclear de- velopment, the federation has responded, in alliance with the nuclear industry, to support the development of nuclear power. For example, in 1976 organized labor joined forces with utility companies to defeat the anti-nuclear propositions in California and other states. The Cali- fornia Labor Federation called Proposi- tion 15 “an unwise, unnecessary measure POWER that would force the shutdown of exist- ing nuclear power plants in the state,” and claimed that “it would impose a ‘no growth’ economy on California, thereby increasing unemployment in a state already burdened by approximately one million jobless workers.”’ BY REBECCA LOGAN AND DOROTHY NELKIN THE TRADE UNION MOVEMENT is strongly identified with a pro-nuclear position. Headlines such as “Labor Protests Order to Shut Nuclear Plant,” “1,000 Construction Workers Rally to Back Seabrook Nuclear Plant ,” “30 Unionists Find Atom No Threat” assure us that union members sup- port the development of nuclear power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development Taylor & Francis

Labor and Nuclear Power


Abstract

AFL-CIO and Nuclear Power In 1976 the AFLCIO conference on Nuclear Energy and America’s Energy Needs concluded that “rapid develop- ment of nuclear power is a ‘must’ with- out which the nation’s economy would falter .” Whenever anti-nuclear groups have obstructed specific projects or proposed state propositions to hinder nuclear de- velopment, the federation has responded, in alliance with the nuclear industry, to support the development of nuclear power. For example, in 1976 organized labor joined forces with utility companies to defeat the anti-nuclear propositions in California and other states. The Cali- fornia Labor Federation called Proposi- tion 15 “an unwise, unnecessary measure POWER that would force the shutdown of exist- ing nuclear power plants in the state,” and claimed that “it would impose a ‘no growth’ economy on California, thereby increasing unemployment in a state already burdened by approximately one million jobless workers.”’ BY REBECCA LOGAN AND DOROTHY NELKIN THE TRADE UNION MOVEMENT is strongly identified with a pro-nuclear position. Headlines such as “Labor Protests Order to Shut Nuclear Plant,” “1,000 Construction Workers Rally to Back Seabrook Nuclear Plant ,” “30 Unionists Find Atom No Threat” assure us that union members sup- port the development of nuclear power.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1939-9154
eISSN
0013-9257
DOI
10.1080/00139157.1980.9929741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AFL-CIO and Nuclear Power In 1976 the AFLCIO conference on Nuclear Energy and America’s Energy Needs concluded that “rapid develop- ment of nuclear power is a ‘must’ with- out which the nation’s economy would falter .” Whenever anti-nuclear groups have obstructed specific projects or proposed state propositions to hinder nuclear de- velopment, the federation has responded, in alliance with the nuclear industry, to support the development of nuclear power. For example, in 1976 organized labor joined forces with utility companies to defeat the anti-nuclear propositions in California and other states. The Cali- fornia Labor Federation called Proposi- tion 15 “an unwise, unnecessary measure POWER that would force the shutdown of exist- ing nuclear power plants in the state,” and claimed that “it would impose a ‘no growth’ economy on California, thereby increasing unemployment in a state already burdened by approximately one million jobless workers.”’ BY REBECCA LOGAN AND DOROTHY NELKIN THE TRADE UNION MOVEMENT is strongly identified with a pro-nuclear position. Headlines such as “Labor Protests Order to Shut Nuclear Plant,” “1,000 Construction Workers Rally to Back Seabrook Nuclear Plant ,” “30 Unionists Find Atom No Threat” assure us that union members sup- port the development of nuclear power.

Journal

Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable DevelopmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1980

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