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Land division and cultural influence in late medieval northern Sweden

Land division and cultural influence in late medieval northern Sweden In the northern part of Sweden, in the old province of Västerbotten, permanent rural settlement and agriculture was a late occurrence. During the early phases of development only small, consolidated areas of arable were used. In the fourteenth century, following a peace treaty with the principality of Novgorod, the Swedish state began to take measures to secure its supremacy in the region. An open-field system was introduced at about the same time as taxation on land. The investigated area formed part of a region encompassing both the western/Swedish and the eastern/Finnish coast of the Gulf of Bothnia characterised by similarities in natural resources and living conditions. Cultural influence from Finland could be found in the whole of the area, in a later phase mixed with elements from central Sweden. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape History Taylor & Francis

Land division and cultural influence in late medieval northern Sweden

Landscape History , Volume 23 (1): 10 – Jan 1, 2001
10 pages

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2160-2506
eISSN
0143-3768
DOI
10.1080/01433768.2001.10594530
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the northern part of Sweden, in the old province of Västerbotten, permanent rural settlement and agriculture was a late occurrence. During the early phases of development only small, consolidated areas of arable were used. In the fourteenth century, following a peace treaty with the principality of Novgorod, the Swedish state began to take measures to secure its supremacy in the region. An open-field system was introduced at about the same time as taxation on land. The investigated area formed part of a region encompassing both the western/Swedish and the eastern/Finnish coast of the Gulf of Bothnia characterised by similarities in natural resources and living conditions. Cultural influence from Finland could be found in the whole of the area, in a later phase mixed with elements from central Sweden.

Journal

Landscape HistoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2001

Keywords: Land division; shore-regression; taxation; Swedish/Finnish; northern Sweden

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