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Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place

Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place 290 BOOK REVIEWS Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place, by Nicole Porter, London, Routledge, 2016, 239 pp., $160.00 (hardback), ISBN 9781138843547 In her final interlude in Landscape and Branding, Nicole Porter describes a moment walking along a track in the Blue Mountains when a “large droplet of water silently descended from a clifftop … launching itself into the void and plummeting downward before landing directly on my head” (216). The cold droplet permeated her hair and skin and made her laugh out loud, “it was like the landscape had entered my head, taken over my body and used it to laugh. The wilderness and I were laughing together.” The vignette evokes a tension that runs through Porter’s original account of branding Australia’s Blue Mountains landscape. Are those moments where humans are affected by sublime wild spaces, moments that resist representation, beyond the reach of the calculative logic of brands? Porter, who teaches in the Department of Architecture and Built Environment at the University of Nottingham, argues that landscapes are cultural artefacts that codify the natural environment as rep- resentations and programmed experiences. Landscapes are produced through techniques such as painting and photography, and via the creation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Consumption Markets and Culture Taylor & Francis

Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place

Consumption Markets and Culture , Volume 21 (3): 4 – May 4, 2018

Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place

Consumption Markets and Culture , Volume 21 (3): 4 – May 4, 2018

Abstract

290 BOOK REVIEWS Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place, by Nicole Porter, London, Routledge, 2016, 239 pp., $160.00 (hardback), ISBN 9781138843547 In her final interlude in Landscape and Branding, Nicole Porter describes a moment walking along a track in the Blue Mountains when a “large droplet of water silently descended from a clifftop … launching itself into the void and plummeting downward before landing directly on my head” (216). The cold droplet permeated her hair and skin and made her laugh out loud, “it was like the landscape had entered my head, taken over my body and used it to laugh. The wilderness and I were laughing together.” The vignette evokes a tension that runs through Porter’s original account of branding Australia’s Blue Mountains landscape. Are those moments where humans are affected by sublime wild spaces, moments that resist representation, beyond the reach of the calculative logic of brands? Porter, who teaches in the Department of Architecture and Built Environment at the University of Nottingham, argues that landscapes are cultural artefacts that codify the natural environment as rep- resentations and programmed experiences. Landscapes are produced through techniques such as painting and photography, and via the creation

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References (5)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Nicholas Carah
ISSN
1477-223X
eISSN
1025-3866
DOI
10.1080/10253866.2016.1225328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

290 BOOK REVIEWS Landscape and branding: the promotion and production of place, by Nicole Porter, London, Routledge, 2016, 239 pp., $160.00 (hardback), ISBN 9781138843547 In her final interlude in Landscape and Branding, Nicole Porter describes a moment walking along a track in the Blue Mountains when a “large droplet of water silently descended from a clifftop … launching itself into the void and plummeting downward before landing directly on my head” (216). The cold droplet permeated her hair and skin and made her laugh out loud, “it was like the landscape had entered my head, taken over my body and used it to laugh. The wilderness and I were laughing together.” The vignette evokes a tension that runs through Porter’s original account of branding Australia’s Blue Mountains landscape. Are those moments where humans are affected by sublime wild spaces, moments that resist representation, beyond the reach of the calculative logic of brands? Porter, who teaches in the Department of Architecture and Built Environment at the University of Nottingham, argues that landscapes are cultural artefacts that codify the natural environment as rep- resentations and programmed experiences. Landscapes are produced through techniques such as painting and photography, and via the creation

Journal

Consumption Markets and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2018

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