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Landscape Plotted and Pieced: Landscape History and Local Archaeology in Fyfield and Overton, Wiltshire. By P.J. Fowler

Landscape Plotted and Pieced: Landscape History and Local Archaeology in Fyfield and Overton,... 388 REVIEWS as palynology, Evans makes use of all the evidence at his disposal in each case study to provide an interesting multidisciplinary approach to landscape reconstruction and change. It is refreshing to see in the later chapters a wide variety of approaches drawn upon, including heavy metals analysis of alluvium and peats, the use of insect and other environmental remains in Roman towns and the environmental records evident in the plant macrofossil records from Bolton Fell and Walton Mosses. In consideration of the latter work, Evans rightly draws attention to the problems inherent with the chronology of some of these investigations, particularly where clearances have been attributed to Roman activities in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. He suggests ways in which the chronology could be refined, including very fine, high-resolution sampling for AMS dating, wiggle-matching and Bayesian calibration. To this list might be added the use of tephrochronology. Another approach might be to examine the environmental evidence from Roman forts such as Carlisle and Vindolanda, and Evans highlights the usefulness of a dendrochronological approach and even the insect evidence from Carlisle. Indeed, his whole discussion of the environmental evidence associated with the River Tyne and Hadrian's Wall provides http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archaeological Journal Taylor & Francis

Landscape Plotted and Pieced: Landscape History and Local Archaeology in Fyfield and Overton, Wiltshire. By P.J. Fowler

Archaeological Journal , Volume 158 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 2001
2 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2001 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2373-2288
eISSN
0066-5983
DOI
10.1080/00665983.2001.11079021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

388 REVIEWS as palynology, Evans makes use of all the evidence at his disposal in each case study to provide an interesting multidisciplinary approach to landscape reconstruction and change. It is refreshing to see in the later chapters a wide variety of approaches drawn upon, including heavy metals analysis of alluvium and peats, the use of insect and other environmental remains in Roman towns and the environmental records evident in the plant macrofossil records from Bolton Fell and Walton Mosses. In consideration of the latter work, Evans rightly draws attention to the problems inherent with the chronology of some of these investigations, particularly where clearances have been attributed to Roman activities in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. He suggests ways in which the chronology could be refined, including very fine, high-resolution sampling for AMS dating, wiggle-matching and Bayesian calibration. To this list might be added the use of tephrochronology. Another approach might be to examine the environmental evidence from Roman forts such as Carlisle and Vindolanda, and Evans highlights the usefulness of a dendrochronological approach and even the insect evidence from Carlisle. Indeed, his whole discussion of the environmental evidence associated with the River Tyne and Hadrian's Wall provides

Journal

Archaeological JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.