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Learning Preproof Geometry With LOGO

Learning Preproof Geometry With LOGO Thirty-two fourth graders with previous experience in learning LOGO were assigned randomly by mathematical ability to one of two conditions for geometry instruction. Children in both conditions received inquiry-based instruction and identical declarative specifications of preproof geometric concepts such as line, angle, and quadrilateral. In one condition, procedural specifications of the geometry concepts employed traditional construction tools such as protractors and rulers. In the second condition, however, procedural specification of the concepts entailed the use of a modified form of LOGO. After instruction, children responded to measures of attitude, knowledge acquisition, knowledge application, and knowledge organization. The measure of knowledge organization suggested instructionally related differences in the representation of some concepts, with children participating in the traditional condition more likely to attend to surface features of the subject matter. No differences between instructional conditions were observed for either attitude or knowledge acquisition. However, children using LOGO were better able to apply what they had learned. Similar results were obtained at posttest intervals of 10 and 16 weeks. The results suggest that LOGO is an effective means for elaborating children's procedural interpretations of some preproof geometry concepts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cognition and Instruction Taylor & Francis

Learning Preproof Geometry With LOGO

Learning Preproof Geometry With LOGO

Cognition and Instruction , Volume 6 (2): 26 – Jun 1, 1989

Abstract

Thirty-two fourth graders with previous experience in learning LOGO were assigned randomly by mathematical ability to one of two conditions for geometry instruction. Children in both conditions received inquiry-based instruction and identical declarative specifications of preproof geometric concepts such as line, angle, and quadrilateral. In one condition, procedural specifications of the geometry concepts employed traditional construction tools such as protractors and rulers. In the second condition, however, procedural specification of the concepts entailed the use of a modified form of LOGO. After instruction, children responded to measures of attitude, knowledge acquisition, knowledge application, and knowledge organization. The measure of knowledge organization suggested instructionally related differences in the representation of some concepts, with children participating in the traditional condition more likely to attend to surface features of the subject matter. No differences between instructional conditions were observed for either attitude or knowledge acquisition. However, children using LOGO were better able to apply what they had learned. Similar results were obtained at posttest intervals of 10 and 16 weeks. The results suggest that LOGO is an effective means for elaborating children's procedural interpretations of some preproof geometry concepts.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-690X
eISSN
0737-0008
DOI
10.1207/s1532690xci0602_2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thirty-two fourth graders with previous experience in learning LOGO were assigned randomly by mathematical ability to one of two conditions for geometry instruction. Children in both conditions received inquiry-based instruction and identical declarative specifications of preproof geometric concepts such as line, angle, and quadrilateral. In one condition, procedural specifications of the geometry concepts employed traditional construction tools such as protractors and rulers. In the second condition, however, procedural specification of the concepts entailed the use of a modified form of LOGO. After instruction, children responded to measures of attitude, knowledge acquisition, knowledge application, and knowledge organization. The measure of knowledge organization suggested instructionally related differences in the representation of some concepts, with children participating in the traditional condition more likely to attend to surface features of the subject matter. No differences between instructional conditions were observed for either attitude or knowledge acquisition. However, children using LOGO were better able to apply what they had learned. Similar results were obtained at posttest intervals of 10 and 16 weeks. The results suggest that LOGO is an effective means for elaborating children's procedural interpretations of some preproof geometry concepts.

Journal

Cognition and InstructionTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1989

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