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Listening for spaces of ordinariness: Filipino-Canadian youths' transnational lives

Listening for spaces of ordinariness: Filipino-Canadian youths' transnational lives I consider different ways that Filipino-Canadian immigrant youths and their mothers tell their stories of their transnational experiences. Second-generation youths tell of coming into Filipino identity in their teens and developing a strong sense of transnational identification. Filipino youths who have migrated recently to Canada through their mothers' involvement in the Live-in Caregiver Program provide a less fulsome picture of their transnational experiences. I puzzle over why this is so, reasoning that their experiences are more difficult to talk about because they involve revealing intimate details of family life, and because children often have little agency or information about family migration plans. Beyond this, there is the possibility that I simply failed to hear what they were saying because of the manner in which it was said. They do not construct their experiences in narrative form. Instead they tell of their experience in fragments, in what I call – following Berlant, spaces of ordinariness. I consider the practical and political implications of listening for different forms of agency and subjecthood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Children's Geographies Taylor & Francis

Listening for spaces of ordinariness: Filipino-Canadian youths' transnational lives

Children's Geographies , Volume 8 (4): 10 – Nov 1, 2010
10 pages

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References (26)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1473-3277
eISSN
1473-3285
DOI
10.1080/14733285.2010.510999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I consider different ways that Filipino-Canadian immigrant youths and their mothers tell their stories of their transnational experiences. Second-generation youths tell of coming into Filipino identity in their teens and developing a strong sense of transnational identification. Filipino youths who have migrated recently to Canada through their mothers' involvement in the Live-in Caregiver Program provide a less fulsome picture of their transnational experiences. I puzzle over why this is so, reasoning that their experiences are more difficult to talk about because they involve revealing intimate details of family life, and because children often have little agency or information about family migration plans. Beyond this, there is the possibility that I simply failed to hear what they were saying because of the manner in which it was said. They do not construct their experiences in narrative form. Instead they tell of their experience in fragments, in what I call – following Berlant, spaces of ordinariness. I consider the practical and political implications of listening for different forms of agency and subjecthood.

Journal

Children's GeographiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2010

Keywords: Filipino; migration; children of domestic workers; second-generation youths; agency

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