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Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal stability of subtype membership was fair and appeared stronger for phonological than surface dyslexia. Phonological dyslexia was associated with a pronounced phonological awareness deficit, but subgroups otherwise had similar cognitive profiles. Subtype did not inform prognosis. Results provide modest evidence for the validity of the distinction, although not for its clinical utility. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scientific Studies of Reading Taylor & Francis

Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

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References (57)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Society for the Scientific Study of Reading
ISSN
1532-799X
eISSN
1088-8438
DOI
10.1080/10888438.2014.904870
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal stability of subtype membership was fair and appeared stronger for phonological than surface dyslexia. Phonological dyslexia was associated with a pronounced phonological awareness deficit, but subgroups otherwise had similar cognitive profiles. Subtype did not inform prognosis. Results provide modest evidence for the validity of the distinction, although not for its clinical utility.

Journal

Scientific Studies of ReadingTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 3, 2014

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