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Macroprocesses and Microprocesses in the Development of Summarization Skill

Macroprocesses and Microprocesses in the Development of Summarization Skill This study explored how students' mental representations of an expository text and the inferences they generated varied as a function of text difficulty and of differences in the task. Ninety-six students from Grades 6 and 10 and college were asked to write summaries of an expository text and then to answer orally several probe questions about the content. Reading difficulty was systematically manipulated at the microstructure and macrostructure processing levels. The results support the prediction of qualitative changes in the way the meaning is represented by different age groups in different text conditions. These are related to the amount and kinds of inferential processes on which the summaries were based. Interestingly, college students generalized the content more in summarizing texts with poor macrostructure than in summarizing texts with good macrostructure. That more macropropositional statements occurred in responding to the probe questions than in the summaries could be explained in terms of the different retrieval conditions that prevailed. Some educational implications of these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cognition and Instruction Taylor & Francis

Macroprocesses and Microprocesses in the Development of Summarization Skill

Cognition and Instruction , Volume 7 (3): 35 – Sep 1, 1990

Macroprocesses and Microprocesses in the Development of Summarization Skill

Cognition and Instruction , Volume 7 (3): 35 – Sep 1, 1990

Abstract

This study explored how students' mental representations of an expository text and the inferences they generated varied as a function of text difficulty and of differences in the task. Ninety-six students from Grades 6 and 10 and college were asked to write summaries of an expository text and then to answer orally several probe questions about the content. Reading difficulty was systematically manipulated at the microstructure and macrostructure processing levels. The results support the prediction of qualitative changes in the way the meaning is represented by different age groups in different text conditions. These are related to the amount and kinds of inferential processes on which the summaries were based. Interestingly, college students generalized the content more in summarizing texts with poor macrostructure than in summarizing texts with good macrostructure. That more macropropositional statements occurred in responding to the probe questions than in the summaries could be explained in terms of the different retrieval conditions that prevailed. Some educational implications of these findings are discussed.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-690X
eISSN
0737-0008
DOI
10.1207/s1532690xci0703_1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study explored how students' mental representations of an expository text and the inferences they generated varied as a function of text difficulty and of differences in the task. Ninety-six students from Grades 6 and 10 and college were asked to write summaries of an expository text and then to answer orally several probe questions about the content. Reading difficulty was systematically manipulated at the microstructure and macrostructure processing levels. The results support the prediction of qualitative changes in the way the meaning is represented by different age groups in different text conditions. These are related to the amount and kinds of inferential processes on which the summaries were based. Interestingly, college students generalized the content more in summarizing texts with poor macrostructure than in summarizing texts with good macrostructure. That more macropropositional statements occurred in responding to the probe questions than in the summaries could be explained in terms of the different retrieval conditions that prevailed. Some educational implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal

Cognition and InstructionTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.