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Making space for fish: the regional, network and fluid spaces of fisheries certification

Making space for fish: the regional, network and fluid spaces of fisheries certification In this paper, we examine the multiple spatialities of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certifications. The MSC uses its ecolabelling scheme to promote sustainable fisheries management; its logo may be used on the products of certified fisheries. The certification process involves the definition of a ‘fishery’. This involves the designation of boundaries around a particular location. While these boundaries suggest exclusivity for each fishery, these regional spaces are also entwined in the MSC's network, whereby they are viewed relationally. The utility of areal boundaries is also rendered problematic by the materiality of the seas: coastlines change, fish swim, water moves and ships travel. To operate its scheme successfully, the MSC has to recognise this spatial fluidity, acknowledging the rupture of boundaries and the movement of actors. We argue that attention to a multiplicity of spatialities helps direct attention to the role of non-humans in the acting out of hybrid geographies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social & Cultural Geography Taylor & Francis

Making space for fish: the regional, network and fluid spaces of fisheries certification

Social & Cultural Geography , Volume 9 (5): 18 – Aug 1, 2008
18 pages

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References (54)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1470-1197
eISSN
1464-9365
DOI
10.1080/14649360802224358
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the multiple spatialities of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certifications. The MSC uses its ecolabelling scheme to promote sustainable fisheries management; its logo may be used on the products of certified fisheries. The certification process involves the definition of a ‘fishery’. This involves the designation of boundaries around a particular location. While these boundaries suggest exclusivity for each fishery, these regional spaces are also entwined in the MSC's network, whereby they are viewed relationally. The utility of areal boundaries is also rendered problematic by the materiality of the seas: coastlines change, fish swim, water moves and ships travel. To operate its scheme successfully, the MSC has to recognise this spatial fluidity, acknowledging the rupture of boundaries and the movement of actors. We argue that attention to a multiplicity of spatialities helps direct attention to the role of non-humans in the acting out of hybrid geographies.

Journal

Social & Cultural GeographyTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2008

Keywords: Marine Stewardship Council; fisheries certification; boundaries; actor-network theory; fluid spaces; hybrid geographies; Marine Stewardship Council; certification des pêcheries; limites; théorie de l'acteur-réseau; espaces fluides; géographies hybrides; Marine Stewardship Council; certificación de pesquerías; límites; actor; la teoría de redes; espacios fluidos; las geografías híbridas

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