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Managerialism and the conceptual limits of sustainable development

Managerialism and the conceptual limits of sustainable development This article examines the concept of sustainable development in terms of the three classical sociological paradigms—that is, the class, managerial, and pluralist traditions. In so doing, it is discovered that the concept of sustainable development is firmly rooted in the managerial tradition, and that the concept is often opposed by writers in the class and pluralist traditions. This implies that the power and scope of the concept, although having grown greatly in recent years, is inherently limited by its ideological character. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Society & Natural Resources Taylor & Francis

Managerialism and the conceptual limits of sustainable development

Society & Natural Resources , Volume 8 (6): 12 – Nov 1, 1995

Managerialism and the conceptual limits of sustainable development

Society & Natural Resources , Volume 8 (6): 12 – Nov 1, 1995

Abstract

This article examines the concept of sustainable development in terms of the three classical sociological paradigms—that is, the class, managerial, and pluralist traditions. In so doing, it is discovered that the concept of sustainable development is firmly rooted in the managerial tradition, and that the concept is often opposed by writers in the class and pluralist traditions. This implies that the power and scope of the concept, although having grown greatly in recent years, is inherently limited by its ideological character.

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1521-0723
eISSN
0894-1920
DOI
10.1080/08941929509380939
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines the concept of sustainable development in terms of the three classical sociological paradigms—that is, the class, managerial, and pluralist traditions. In so doing, it is discovered that the concept of sustainable development is firmly rooted in the managerial tradition, and that the concept is often opposed by writers in the class and pluralist traditions. This implies that the power and scope of the concept, although having grown greatly in recent years, is inherently limited by its ideological character.

Journal

Society & Natural ResourcesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 1995

Keywords: environmental management; ideology; paradigm; sociology; sustainable development

There are no references for this article.