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Measurements of POI-based mixed use and their relationships with neighbourhood vibrancy

Measurements of POI-based mixed use and their relationships with neighbourhood vibrancy Although mixed use is an emerging strategy that has been widely accepted in urban planning for promoting neighbourhood vibrancy, there is no consensus on how to quantitatively measure the mix and the effects of mixed use on neighbourhood vibrancy. Shannon entropy, the most commonly used diversity measurement in assessing mixed use, has been found to be inadequate in measuring the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed use. And lack of data also makes it difficult to find the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. However, the recent availability of new sources including mobile phone data and Point of Interest (POI) data have made it possible to develop new indices of mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy to analyse their relationships. Taking advantage of these emerging new data sources, this study used the numbers of mobile phone users in a 24-hour period as a proxy of neighbourhood vibrancy and used POIs from a navigation database to develop a series of mixed-use indicators that can better reflect the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed-use neighbourhoods. The Hill numbers, a unified form of diversity measurement used in ecological literature that includes richness, entropy, and the Simpson index, are used to measure the degrees of mixed use. Using such fine-grained data sets and the Hill numbers allowed us to obtain better insights into the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. Four models varying in POI measurements that reflect different dimensions of mixed use were presented. The results showed that either POI density or entropy can explain approximately 1% of neighbourhood vibrancy, while POI richness contributes significantly in improving neighbourhood vibrancy. The results also revealed that the entropy has limitations as a measure for representing mixed use and demonstrated the necessity of adopting a set of more appropriate measurements for mixed use. Increasing the number of POIs has limited power to improve neighbourhood vibrancy compared with encouraging the mixing of complementary POIs. These exploratory findings may be useful for adjusting mixed-use assessments and to help guide urban planning and neighbourhood design. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Geographic Information Science Taylor & Francis

Measurements of POI-based mixed use and their relationships with neighbourhood vibrancy

Measurements of POI-based mixed use and their relationships with neighbourhood vibrancy

International Journal of Geographic Information Science , Volume 31 (4): 18 – Apr 3, 2017

Abstract

Although mixed use is an emerging strategy that has been widely accepted in urban planning for promoting neighbourhood vibrancy, there is no consensus on how to quantitatively measure the mix and the effects of mixed use on neighbourhood vibrancy. Shannon entropy, the most commonly used diversity measurement in assessing mixed use, has been found to be inadequate in measuring the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed use. And lack of data also makes it difficult to find the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. However, the recent availability of new sources including mobile phone data and Point of Interest (POI) data have made it possible to develop new indices of mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy to analyse their relationships. Taking advantage of these emerging new data sources, this study used the numbers of mobile phone users in a 24-hour period as a proxy of neighbourhood vibrancy and used POIs from a navigation database to develop a series of mixed-use indicators that can better reflect the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed-use neighbourhoods. The Hill numbers, a unified form of diversity measurement used in ecological literature that includes richness, entropy, and the Simpson index, are used to measure the degrees of mixed use. Using such fine-grained data sets and the Hill numbers allowed us to obtain better insights into the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. Four models varying in POI measurements that reflect different dimensions of mixed use were presented. The results showed that either POI density or entropy can explain approximately 1% of neighbourhood vibrancy, while POI richness contributes significantly in improving neighbourhood vibrancy. The results also revealed that the entropy has limitations as a measure for representing mixed use and demonstrated the necessity of adopting a set of more appropriate measurements for mixed use. Increasing the number of POIs has limited power to improve neighbourhood vibrancy compared with encouraging the mixing of complementary POIs. These exploratory findings may be useful for adjusting mixed-use assessments and to help guide urban planning and neighbourhood design.

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References (48)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
ISSN
1362-3087
eISSN
1365-8816
DOI
10.1080/13658816.2016.1220561
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although mixed use is an emerging strategy that has been widely accepted in urban planning for promoting neighbourhood vibrancy, there is no consensus on how to quantitatively measure the mix and the effects of mixed use on neighbourhood vibrancy. Shannon entropy, the most commonly used diversity measurement in assessing mixed use, has been found to be inadequate in measuring the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed use. And lack of data also makes it difficult to find the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. However, the recent availability of new sources including mobile phone data and Point of Interest (POI) data have made it possible to develop new indices of mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy to analyse their relationships. Taking advantage of these emerging new data sources, this study used the numbers of mobile phone users in a 24-hour period as a proxy of neighbourhood vibrancy and used POIs from a navigation database to develop a series of mixed-use indicators that can better reflect the multifaceted, multidimensional characteristics of mixed-use neighbourhoods. The Hill numbers, a unified form of diversity measurement used in ecological literature that includes richness, entropy, and the Simpson index, are used to measure the degrees of mixed use. Using such fine-grained data sets and the Hill numbers allowed us to obtain better insights into the relationship between mixed use and neighbourhood vibrancy. Four models varying in POI measurements that reflect different dimensions of mixed use were presented. The results showed that either POI density or entropy can explain approximately 1% of neighbourhood vibrancy, while POI richness contributes significantly in improving neighbourhood vibrancy. The results also revealed that the entropy has limitations as a measure for representing mixed use and demonstrated the necessity of adopting a set of more appropriate measurements for mixed use. Increasing the number of POIs has limited power to improve neighbourhood vibrancy compared with encouraging the mixing of complementary POIs. These exploratory findings may be useful for adjusting mixed-use assessments and to help guide urban planning and neighbourhood design.

Journal

International Journal of Geographic Information ScienceTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2017

Keywords: Neighbourhood vibrancy; mixed land use; diversity measurement; POI

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