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Measuring poor job quality amongst employees: the VicWAL job quality index

Measuring poor job quality amongst employees: the VicWAL job quality index Job quality is a central, though contested, concern of contemporary employment relations. Our focus in this article is on poor job quality, which can have a major impact on employee well-being and work–life outcomes. We report on the construction of a job quality index (JQI) using items from the 2009 Victorian Work and Life (VicWAL) survey, which had 3007 employee respondents. The VicWAL JQI is composed of 15 items, subsumed in six components that are recognised in the literature as contributing to job quality: working-time autonomy, job security, job control, workload, skill development and access to work–life provisions. Our measure counts aggregate job quality deficits across the six components. The VicWAL JQI performs as expected in regard to several key screening variables, including contract status and occupation, and has a significant linear relationship with a measure of work–life interference. We find almost one-fifth of respondents are located in very poor-quality jobs (two or more reported deficits in components), with considerable diversity in these jobs and in the deficits reported. High workloads were reported in almost half the sample. The article explores the intriguing impact of workload on the VicWAL JQI and highlights the implications of the measure for the assessment of job quality in Australia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labour & Industry: A Journal of the Social and Economic Relations of Work Taylor & Francis

Measuring poor job quality amongst employees: the VicWAL job quality index

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References (43)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 AIRAANZ
ISSN
2325-5676
eISSN
1030-1763
DOI
10.1080/10301763.2014.915787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Job quality is a central, though contested, concern of contemporary employment relations. Our focus in this article is on poor job quality, which can have a major impact on employee well-being and work–life outcomes. We report on the construction of a job quality index (JQI) using items from the 2009 Victorian Work and Life (VicWAL) survey, which had 3007 employee respondents. The VicWAL JQI is composed of 15 items, subsumed in six components that are recognised in the literature as contributing to job quality: working-time autonomy, job security, job control, workload, skill development and access to work–life provisions. Our measure counts aggregate job quality deficits across the six components. The VicWAL JQI performs as expected in regard to several key screening variables, including contract status and occupation, and has a significant linear relationship with a measure of work–life interference. We find almost one-fifth of respondents are located in very poor-quality jobs (two or more reported deficits in components), with considerable diversity in these jobs and in the deficits reported. High workloads were reported in almost half the sample. The article explores the intriguing impact of workload on the VicWAL JQI and highlights the implications of the measure for the assessment of job quality in Australia.

Journal

Labour & Industry: A Journal of the Social and Economic Relations of WorkTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2014

Keywords: job quality measurement; poor job quality; working conditions; work–life balance; workload

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