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Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications

Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications BOOK REVI EWS 1009 Erkki Huhtamo & Jussi Parikka, Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011), 368 pp., ISBN: 9780520262744 (pbk), £18.95. Media Archaeology looks like a classic work of arts and humanities scholarship at first sight. Assembling theoretical and methodological reflections on media archaeology as well as historic case studies organized around different, partly exotic, media technologies – including the Japanese ‘Baby Talkie’, a special kind of zoetrope for the gramophone, or the ‘Love Letter Generator’ invented by Christopher Strachey – readers of this journal may ask why the book should matter to the social sciences. That was my first reaction when I was invited to review the book, at any rate. Having read the book, however, I do see how the media archaeology approach presented in the book can figure as a valuable contribution to our own work. In fact, the main arguments of the anthology are closely related to central ideas from the field of science and technology studies, my own disciplinary background. Bruno Latour’s notion ‘technology is society made durable’ immediately came to my mind when working my way through the book. The idea of ascribing agency to technologies, or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Information, Communication and Society" Taylor & Francis

Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications

"Information, Communication and Society" , Volume 16 (6): 4 – Aug 1, 2013

Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications

"Information, Communication and Society" , Volume 16 (6): 4 – Aug 1, 2013

Abstract

BOOK REVI EWS 1009 Erkki Huhtamo & Jussi Parikka, Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011), 368 pp., ISBN: 9780520262744 (pbk), £18.95. Media Archaeology looks like a classic work of arts and humanities scholarship at first sight. Assembling theoretical and methodological reflections on media archaeology as well as historic case studies organized around different, partly exotic, media technologies – including the Japanese ‘Baby Talkie’, a special kind of zoetrope for the gramophone, or the ‘Love Letter Generator’ invented by Christopher Strachey – readers of this journal may ask why the book should matter to the social sciences. That was my first reaction when I was invited to review the book, at any rate. Having read the book, however, I do see how the media archaeology approach presented in the book can figure as a valuable contribution to our own work. In fact, the main arguments of the anthology are closely related to central ideas from the field of science and technology studies, my own disciplinary background. Bruno Latour’s notion ‘technology is society made durable’ immediately came to my mind when working my way through the book. The idea of ascribing agency to technologies, or

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References (2)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Astrid Mager
ISSN
1468-4462
eISSN
1369-118X
DOI
10.1080/1369118X.2012.722224
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVI EWS 1009 Erkki Huhtamo & Jussi Parikka, Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011), 368 pp., ISBN: 9780520262744 (pbk), £18.95. Media Archaeology looks like a classic work of arts and humanities scholarship at first sight. Assembling theoretical and methodological reflections on media archaeology as well as historic case studies organized around different, partly exotic, media technologies – including the Japanese ‘Baby Talkie’, a special kind of zoetrope for the gramophone, or the ‘Love Letter Generator’ invented by Christopher Strachey – readers of this journal may ask why the book should matter to the social sciences. That was my first reaction when I was invited to review the book, at any rate. Having read the book, however, I do see how the media archaeology approach presented in the book can figure as a valuable contribution to our own work. In fact, the main arguments of the anthology are closely related to central ideas from the field of science and technology studies, my own disciplinary background. Bruno Latour’s notion ‘technology is society made durable’ immediately came to my mind when working my way through the book. The idea of ascribing agency to technologies, or

Journal

"Information, Communication and Society"Taylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2013

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