Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

National identity and the 'other'

National identity and the 'other' This article explores the role of others in the (re-)definition of national identity. A brief review of dominant theories of nationalism shows that the existence of the 'other' is an implicit assumption made by most scholars. Nevertheless, the relationship between the nation and the other remains largely unexplored. However, national identity is defined not only from within, namely from the features that fellow-nationals share in common but also from without, that is, through distinguishing and differentiating the nation from other nations or ethnic groups. National identity becomes meaningful only through the contrast with others. This article introduces the notion of 'significant others' to investigate the ways in which others may condition the formation or lead to a transformation of the identity of the ingroup. The Macedonian question and the emergence of a new Greek nationalism is used as a case-study to highlight the role of significant others in shaping the identity of the nation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnic and Racial Studies Taylor & Francis

National identity and the 'other'

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 21 (4): 20 – Jan 1, 1998
20 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/national-identity-and-the-apos-other-apos-lnvf1k4ipq

References (25)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4356
eISSN
0141-9870
DOI
10.1080/014198798329784
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores the role of others in the (re-)definition of national identity. A brief review of dominant theories of nationalism shows that the existence of the 'other' is an implicit assumption made by most scholars. Nevertheless, the relationship between the nation and the other remains largely unexplored. However, national identity is defined not only from within, namely from the features that fellow-nationals share in common but also from without, that is, through distinguishing and differentiating the nation from other nations or ethnic groups. National identity becomes meaningful only through the contrast with others. This article introduces the notion of 'significant others' to investigate the ways in which others may condition the formation or lead to a transformation of the identity of the ingroup. The Macedonian question and the emergence of a new Greek nationalism is used as a case-study to highlight the role of significant others in shaping the identity of the nation.

Journal

Ethnic and Racial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1998

Keywords: Nationalism; ‘other’; Greece; Macedonia

There are no references for this article.