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National surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria in Saudi Arabia

National surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria in Saudi Arabia AbstractBackground: Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-positive bacteria are important causes of serious infections.Methods: Between January and December 2009, we examined clinical Gram-positive isolates from 24 hospitals across Saudi Arabia.Results: Among the 13750 isolates, Staphylococcus aureus (62·3%) was the commonest, followed by non-group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (14·8%), group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (7·1%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (6·6%), pneumococci (6·0%), and enterococci (3·1%). Resistance rates were high among S. aureus (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: 32%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (oxacillin: 63%) and pneumococci (penicillin G: 33%; erythromycin: 26%; ceftriaxone: 11%); low among enterococci (vancomycin: 1%) and among beta-haemolytic streptococci. Resistance rates varied between regions, but comparison was complicated by differences in antibiotics tested. Many relevant antibiotics were tested against few isolates (e.g. ampicillin, vancomycin, and high-level gentamicin versus enterococci) while unhelpful tests were widely performed (e.g. cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and imipenem versus staphylococci.Conclusion: Resistance is widespread in staphylococci and pneumococci, but not enterococci and beta-haemolytic streptococci in Saudi Arabia. Rationalization of antibiotic panels tested is urgently needed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Chemotherapy Taylor & Francis

National surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria in Saudi Arabia

National surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria in Saudi Arabia

Journal of Chemotherapy , Volume 26 (1): 6 – Feb 1, 2014

Abstract

AbstractBackground: Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-positive bacteria are important causes of serious infections.Methods: Between January and December 2009, we examined clinical Gram-positive isolates from 24 hospitals across Saudi Arabia.Results: Among the 13750 isolates, Staphylococcus aureus (62·3%) was the commonest, followed by non-group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (14·8%), group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (7·1%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (6·6%), pneumococci (6·0%), and enterococci (3·1%). Resistance rates were high among S. aureus (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: 32%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (oxacillin: 63%) and pneumococci (penicillin G: 33%; erythromycin: 26%; ceftriaxone: 11%); low among enterococci (vancomycin: 1%) and among beta-haemolytic streptococci. Resistance rates varied between regions, but comparison was complicated by differences in antibiotics tested. Many relevant antibiotics were tested against few isolates (e.g. ampicillin, vancomycin, and high-level gentamicin versus enterococci) while unhelpful tests were widely performed (e.g. cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and imipenem versus staphylococci.Conclusion: Resistance is widespread in staphylococci and pneumococci, but not enterococci and beta-haemolytic streptococci in Saudi Arabia. Rationalization of antibiotic panels tested is urgently needed.

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References (22)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
W. S. Maney & Son Ltd
ISSN
1973-9478
eISSN
1120-009X
DOI
10.1179/1973947813Y.0000000084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground: Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-positive bacteria are important causes of serious infections.Methods: Between January and December 2009, we examined clinical Gram-positive isolates from 24 hospitals across Saudi Arabia.Results: Among the 13750 isolates, Staphylococcus aureus (62·3%) was the commonest, followed by non-group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (14·8%), group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (7·1%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (6·6%), pneumococci (6·0%), and enterococci (3·1%). Resistance rates were high among S. aureus (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: 32%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (oxacillin: 63%) and pneumococci (penicillin G: 33%; erythromycin: 26%; ceftriaxone: 11%); low among enterococci (vancomycin: 1%) and among beta-haemolytic streptococci. Resistance rates varied between regions, but comparison was complicated by differences in antibiotics tested. Many relevant antibiotics were tested against few isolates (e.g. ampicillin, vancomycin, and high-level gentamicin versus enterococci) while unhelpful tests were widely performed (e.g. cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and imipenem versus staphylococci.Conclusion: Resistance is widespread in staphylococci and pneumococci, but not enterococci and beta-haemolytic streptococci in Saudi Arabia. Rationalization of antibiotic panels tested is urgently needed.

Journal

Journal of ChemotherapyTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2014

Keywords: Enterococci; MRSA; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococci; Streptococci

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