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Negotiation of ethnoracial configurations among Puerto Rican Taíno activists

Negotiation of ethnoracial configurations among Puerto Rican Taíno activists In Puerto Rico, scholarly histories and common knowledge have presumed that the Taíno – the pre-Columbian population of the island – became extinct at some time between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. However, various people on the island challenge this assumption by claiming to be Taíno. The public reemergence of Taíno groups in Puerto Rico is highly disputed by scholars, governmental institutions and non-Taíno populations of the region, often on the basis of Puerto Rico’s long-documented history of creolization and state-sponsored ideology of racial blending. Within this context, the case of Taíno indigenous activism in Puerto Rico offers a critical lens through which to consider interactional challenges involved in claiming belonging to a presumably “extinct” ethnoracial category. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnic and Racial Studies Taylor & Francis

Negotiation of ethnoracial configurations among Puerto Rican Taíno activists

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 42 (7): 19 – May 19, 2019

Negotiation of ethnoracial configurations among Puerto Rican Taíno activists

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 42 (7): 19 – May 19, 2019

Abstract

In Puerto Rico, scholarly histories and common knowledge have presumed that the Taíno – the pre-Columbian population of the island – became extinct at some time between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. However, various people on the island challenge this assumption by claiming to be Taíno. The public reemergence of Taíno groups in Puerto Rico is highly disputed by scholars, governmental institutions and non-Taíno populations of the region, often on the basis of Puerto Rico’s long-documented history of creolization and state-sponsored ideology of racial blending. Within this context, the case of Taíno indigenous activism in Puerto Rico offers a critical lens through which to consider interactional challenges involved in claiming belonging to a presumably “extinct” ethnoracial category.

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References (51)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1466-4356
eISSN
0141-9870
DOI
10.1080/01419870.2018.1480789
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Puerto Rico, scholarly histories and common knowledge have presumed that the Taíno – the pre-Columbian population of the island – became extinct at some time between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. However, various people on the island challenge this assumption by claiming to be Taíno. The public reemergence of Taíno groups in Puerto Rico is highly disputed by scholars, governmental institutions and non-Taíno populations of the region, often on the basis of Puerto Rico’s long-documented history of creolization and state-sponsored ideology of racial blending. Within this context, the case of Taíno indigenous activism in Puerto Rico offers a critical lens through which to consider interactional challenges involved in claiming belonging to a presumably “extinct” ethnoracial category.

Journal

Ethnic and Racial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: May 19, 2019

Keywords: Caribbean; indigeneity; ethnoracial ideologies; belonging; interaction; identity

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