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Not all job demands are equal: Differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands–Resources model

Not all job demands are equal: Differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job... This study aimed to integrate the differentiation between two types of job demands, as made in previous studies, in the Job–Demands Resources (JD-R) model. Specifically, this study aimed to examine empirically whether the differentiation between job hindrances and job challenges, next to the category of job resources, accounts for the unexpected positive relationships between particular types of job demands (e.g., workload) and employees' work engagement. Results of confirmatory factor analyses supported the differentiation between the three categories of job characteristics in two samples (N 1 = 261 and N 2 = 441). Further, structural equation modelling confirmed the hypotheses that job hindrances associate positively with exhaustion (i.e., the main component of burnout) and negatively with vigour (i.e., the main component of work engagement). Job resources displayed the reversed pattern of relations. Job challenges were positively related to vigour. Rather unexpectedly, they were unrelated to exhaustion. Based on these findings, we discuss the importance of the differentiation between different types of job demands in the JD-R model for both theory and practice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology Taylor & Francis

Not all job demands are equal: Differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands–Resources model

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References (63)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1464-0643
eISSN
1359-432X
DOI
10.1080/13594320903223839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aimed to integrate the differentiation between two types of job demands, as made in previous studies, in the Job–Demands Resources (JD-R) model. Specifically, this study aimed to examine empirically whether the differentiation between job hindrances and job challenges, next to the category of job resources, accounts for the unexpected positive relationships between particular types of job demands (e.g., workload) and employees' work engagement. Results of confirmatory factor analyses supported the differentiation between the three categories of job characteristics in two samples (N 1 = 261 and N 2 = 441). Further, structural equation modelling confirmed the hypotheses that job hindrances associate positively with exhaustion (i.e., the main component of burnout) and negatively with vigour (i.e., the main component of work engagement). Job resources displayed the reversed pattern of relations. Job challenges were positively related to vigour. Rather unexpectedly, they were unrelated to exhaustion. Based on these findings, we discuss the importance of the differentiation between different types of job demands in the JD-R model for both theory and practice.

Journal

European Journal of Work and Organizational PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2010

Keywords: Burnout; Engagement; Job Demands–Resources model; Job challenges; Job hindrances

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