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On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain

On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain Income distribution On intergenerational income mobility in Britain A. B. ATKINSON The extcnt of intergenerational income mobility is a question that has received relatively little attention from economists. Pioneering studies have been carried out in Scandinavia (e.g., Soltow, 1965; and Wolff and van Slijpe, 1973) and the United States (e.g., Sewell and Hauser, 1975), but the subject is in its infancy. In Britain very little is known about the degree of mobility across generations. There has been research on inheritance (e.g., Harbury and Hitch­ cns, 1979), but nothing on the distribution of income as a whole. We do not know if income positions are largely retained from one generation to the next or whether there is a high degree of fluidity. Our lack of knowledge about income mobility across genera­ tions contrasts with the detailed studies that have been made of occllpational mobility. In Britain, work has been done by Ginsberg (1929), Glass (1954), and Goldthorpe (1980), among others, and in the United States reference should be made to the studies of B1au and Duncan (1967) and Featherman and Hauser (1978). These investigations have documented the degree of mobility in occupational status across generations and the changing extent of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Post Keynesian Economics Taylor & Francis

On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain

Journal of Post Keynesian Economics , Volume 3 (2): 25 – Dec 1, 1980

On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain

Journal of Post Keynesian Economics , Volume 3 (2): 25 – Dec 1, 1980

Abstract

Income distribution On intergenerational income mobility in Britain A. B. ATKINSON The extcnt of intergenerational income mobility is a question that has received relatively little attention from economists. Pioneering studies have been carried out in Scandinavia (e.g., Soltow, 1965; and Wolff and van Slijpe, 1973) and the United States (e.g., Sewell and Hauser, 1975), but the subject is in its infancy. In Britain very little is known about the degree of mobility across generations. There has been research on inheritance (e.g., Harbury and Hitch­ cns, 1979), but nothing on the distribution of income as a whole. We do not know if income positions are largely retained from one generation to the next or whether there is a high degree of fluidity. Our lack of knowledge about income mobility across genera­ tions contrasts with the detailed studies that have been made of occllpational mobility. In Britain, work has been done by Ginsberg (1929), Glass (1954), and Goldthorpe (1980), among others, and in the United States reference should be made to the studies of B1au and Duncan (1967) and Featherman and Hauser (1978). These investigations have documented the degree of mobility in occupational status across generations and the changing extent of

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References (22)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1980 by M. E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1557-7821
eISSN
0160-3477
DOI
10.1080/01603477.1980.11489214
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Income distribution On intergenerational income mobility in Britain A. B. ATKINSON The extcnt of intergenerational income mobility is a question that has received relatively little attention from economists. Pioneering studies have been carried out in Scandinavia (e.g., Soltow, 1965; and Wolff and van Slijpe, 1973) and the United States (e.g., Sewell and Hauser, 1975), but the subject is in its infancy. In Britain very little is known about the degree of mobility across generations. There has been research on inheritance (e.g., Harbury and Hitch­ cns, 1979), but nothing on the distribution of income as a whole. We do not know if income positions are largely retained from one generation to the next or whether there is a high degree of fluidity. Our lack of knowledge about income mobility across genera­ tions contrasts with the detailed studies that have been made of occllpational mobility. In Britain, work has been done by Ginsberg (1929), Glass (1954), and Goldthorpe (1980), among others, and in the United States reference should be made to the studies of B1au and Duncan (1967) and Featherman and Hauser (1978). These investigations have documented the degree of mobility in occupational status across generations and the changing extent of

Journal

Journal of Post Keynesian EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 1980

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