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On the economics of household composition

On the economics of household composition Applied Economics, 1988, 20, 1401-141 8 JEAN-PAUL CHAVAS* and ANNETTE M. CITZLERt *University of Wisconsin-Madison, and 'Texas Lutheran College, I. INTRODUCTION The effects of household size and composition on family consumption has been the subject of extensive research.' First, allowing the age and number of household members to influence the expenditure allocation of households helps explain and predict how such demographic effects influence consumption behaviour. Second, much of the research on household size and composition has been motivated by a need for evaluating household welfare as family size and composition change (e.g. Muellbauer, 1974). In particular, researchers have attempted to construct a cost-of-living index to show the income required by a household of a given composition to attain the same level of utility of some reference household (e.g. Kakwani, 1977; Ray, 1983; Muellbauer, 1977; Senneca and Taussig, 1971). Such an index seeks to quantify in one summary measure the changing needs of a family as it expands or changes composition. However, questions have been raised about the appropriateness of a cost-of-living index in making welfare comparisons across households (Pollak and Wales; 1979). The arguments have been that such an index is conditional on household composition and thus does not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Economics Taylor & Francis

On the economics of household composition

Applied Economics , Volume 20 (10): 18 – Oct 1, 1988

On the economics of household composition

Applied Economics , Volume 20 (10): 18 – Oct 1, 1988

Abstract

Applied Economics, 1988, 20, 1401-141 8 JEAN-PAUL CHAVAS* and ANNETTE M. CITZLERt *University of Wisconsin-Madison, and 'Texas Lutheran College, I. INTRODUCTION The effects of household size and composition on family consumption has been the subject of extensive research.' First, allowing the age and number of household members to influence the expenditure allocation of households helps explain and predict how such demographic effects influence consumption behaviour. Second, much of the research on household size and composition has been motivated by a need for evaluating household welfare as family size and composition change (e.g. Muellbauer, 1974). In particular, researchers have attempted to construct a cost-of-living index to show the income required by a household of a given composition to attain the same level of utility of some reference household (e.g. Kakwani, 1977; Ray, 1983; Muellbauer, 1977; Senneca and Taussig, 1971). Such an index seeks to quantify in one summary measure the changing needs of a family as it expands or changes composition. However, questions have been raised about the appropriateness of a cost-of-living index in making welfare comparisons across households (Pollak and Wales; 1979). The arguments have been that such an index is conditional on household composition and thus does not

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References (36)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4283
eISSN
9999-7004
DOI
10.1080/00036848800000109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Applied Economics, 1988, 20, 1401-141 8 JEAN-PAUL CHAVAS* and ANNETTE M. CITZLERt *University of Wisconsin-Madison, and 'Texas Lutheran College, I. INTRODUCTION The effects of household size and composition on family consumption has been the subject of extensive research.' First, allowing the age and number of household members to influence the expenditure allocation of households helps explain and predict how such demographic effects influence consumption behaviour. Second, much of the research on household size and composition has been motivated by a need for evaluating household welfare as family size and composition change (e.g. Muellbauer, 1974). In particular, researchers have attempted to construct a cost-of-living index to show the income required by a household of a given composition to attain the same level of utility of some reference household (e.g. Kakwani, 1977; Ray, 1983; Muellbauer, 1977; Senneca and Taussig, 1971). Such an index seeks to quantify in one summary measure the changing needs of a family as it expands or changes composition. However, questions have been raised about the appropriateness of a cost-of-living index in making welfare comparisons across households (Pollak and Wales; 1979). The arguments have been that such an index is conditional on household composition and thus does not

Journal

Applied EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 1988

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