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Parental, Sibling, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use and Alcohol Problems

Parental, Sibling, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use and Alcohol Problems Structural equation modeling was used with data from over 570 middle adolescents to evaluate a multivariate developmental model of predictors of adolescent alcohol and other drug use, and alcohol problems. Consistent with previous research, peer and sibling substance use were more strongly related to adolescent substance use than parental alcohol use. Sibling substance use was a robust predictor of peer substance use, and both temperament characteristics (e.g., activity level) and stressful life events predicted peer substance use. Sibling substance use also predicted coping motives for drinking by the target adolescent, implicating possible role modeling or imitation for drinking under stressful conditions and a preference for avoidance coping strategies. Alcohol use was a significant predictor of alcohol problems and illicit drug use; however, peer substance use, coping motives for drinking, and stressful life events were also statistically significant predictors of alcohol problems, over and above their influence on level of alcohol use. Findings based on these multivariate relations are discussed with regard to intervention implications and the need to provide more secondary interventions for middle adolescents with alcohol problems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Developmental Science Taylor & Francis

Parental, Sibling, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use and Alcohol Problems

Applied Developmental Science , Volume 4 (2): 13 – Mar 1, 2000

Parental, Sibling, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use and Alcohol Problems

Applied Developmental Science , Volume 4 (2): 13 – Mar 1, 2000

Abstract

Structural equation modeling was used with data from over 570 middle adolescents to evaluate a multivariate developmental model of predictors of adolescent alcohol and other drug use, and alcohol problems. Consistent with previous research, peer and sibling substance use were more strongly related to adolescent substance use than parental alcohol use. Sibling substance use was a robust predictor of peer substance use, and both temperament characteristics (e.g., activity level) and stressful life events predicted peer substance use. Sibling substance use also predicted coping motives for drinking by the target adolescent, implicating possible role modeling or imitation for drinking under stressful conditions and a preference for avoidance coping strategies. Alcohol use was a significant predictor of alcohol problems and illicit drug use; however, peer substance use, coping motives for drinking, and stressful life events were also statistically significant predictors of alcohol problems, over and above their influence on level of alcohol use. Findings based on these multivariate relations are discussed with regard to intervention implications and the need to provide more secondary interventions for middle adolescents with alcohol problems.

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References (48)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-480X
eISSN
1088-8691
DOI
10.1207/S1532480XADS0402_5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Structural equation modeling was used with data from over 570 middle adolescents to evaluate a multivariate developmental model of predictors of adolescent alcohol and other drug use, and alcohol problems. Consistent with previous research, peer and sibling substance use were more strongly related to adolescent substance use than parental alcohol use. Sibling substance use was a robust predictor of peer substance use, and both temperament characteristics (e.g., activity level) and stressful life events predicted peer substance use. Sibling substance use also predicted coping motives for drinking by the target adolescent, implicating possible role modeling or imitation for drinking under stressful conditions and a preference for avoidance coping strategies. Alcohol use was a significant predictor of alcohol problems and illicit drug use; however, peer substance use, coping motives for drinking, and stressful life events were also statistically significant predictors of alcohol problems, over and above their influence on level of alcohol use. Findings based on these multivariate relations are discussed with regard to intervention implications and the need to provide more secondary interventions for middle adolescents with alcohol problems.

Journal

Applied Developmental ScienceTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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