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Partial hepatectomy reduces both metabolism and toxicity of benzene

Partial hepatectomy reduces both metabolism and toxicity of benzene Removal of 70–80% of the liver reduced both the metabolism and the toxicity of benzene in rats. Metabolism was evaluated by measuring the levels of urinary metabolites in both sham‐operated and partially hepatectomized rats given 2200 mg/kg [3H]benzene sc. Toxicity was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 59Fe into circulating erythrocytes according to the method of Lee et al. The observation that partial hepatectomy decreases benzene metabolism and protects against benzene toxicity indicates that the liver may play a primary role in the development of benzene‐induced bone marrow toxicity. The fact that benzene administration also reduces the ability of the liver to regenerate after partial hepatectomy suggests that the regenerating liver may serve as a model system in lieu of the bone marrow for studying the mechanism by which benzene inhibits cell proliferation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Taylor & Francis

Partial hepatectomy reduces both metabolism and toxicity of benzene

Partial hepatectomy reduces both metabolism and toxicity of benzene

Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health , Volume 5 (5): 8 – Sep 1, 1979

Abstract

Removal of 70–80% of the liver reduced both the metabolism and the toxicity of benzene in rats. Metabolism was evaluated by measuring the levels of urinary metabolites in both sham‐operated and partially hepatectomized rats given 2200 mg/kg [3H]benzene sc. Toxicity was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 59Fe into circulating erythrocytes according to the method of Lee et al. The observation that partial hepatectomy decreases benzene metabolism and protects against benzene toxicity indicates that the liver may play a primary role in the development of benzene‐induced bone marrow toxicity. The fact that benzene administration also reduces the ability of the liver to regenerate after partial hepatectomy suggests that the regenerating liver may serve as a model system in lieu of the bone marrow for studying the mechanism by which benzene inhibits cell proliferation.

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References (29)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
0098-4108
DOI
10.1080/15287397909529789
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Removal of 70–80% of the liver reduced both the metabolism and the toxicity of benzene in rats. Metabolism was evaluated by measuring the levels of urinary metabolites in both sham‐operated and partially hepatectomized rats given 2200 mg/kg [3H]benzene sc. Toxicity was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 59Fe into circulating erythrocytes according to the method of Lee et al. The observation that partial hepatectomy decreases benzene metabolism and protects against benzene toxicity indicates that the liver may play a primary role in the development of benzene‐induced bone marrow toxicity. The fact that benzene administration also reduces the ability of the liver to regenerate after partial hepatectomy suggests that the regenerating liver may serve as a model system in lieu of the bone marrow for studying the mechanism by which benzene inhibits cell proliferation.

Journal

Journal of Toxicology and Environmental HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1979

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