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PERFORMATIVITY, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS

PERFORMATIVITY, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS PERFORMATIVITY, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS An overview Presenting the theme of performativity in a journal named the Journal of Cultural Economy makes the role performativity plays in the economy a logical place to start and the debt to Michel Callon (1998) an obvious one to acknowledge. Callon’s idea was that ‘economics does not describe an existing external ‘‘economy’’, but brings that economy into being: economics performs the economy, creating the phenomena it describes’ (MacKenzie & Millo 2003, p. 108). This idea is now recognized by many authors as one of the major contributions to economic sociology (see, e.g., Barry & Slater 2002; Holm 2007; MacKenzie & Millo 2003; MacKenzie 2004, 2007) and has been accompanied by vivid debates across the social sciences about the actual influence of economics and economists over economic practices (e.g. Miller 2000; Callon 2005, 2007; Ferraro et al. 2005; Ghoshal 2005; MacKenzie et al. 2007 and more generally over society and political processes (see, e.g., Bazerman & Malhotra 2006; Fourcade 2001, 2006). But when we remember to take the ‘cultural’ dimension into consideration  that is, when we move beyond economic sociology to the broader intellectual realm of social sciences and humanities at large  we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cultural Economy Taylor & Francis

PERFORMATIVITY, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS

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References (28)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1753-0369
eISSN
1753-0350
DOI
10.1080/17530350.2010.494116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERFORMATIVITY, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS An overview Presenting the theme of performativity in a journal named the Journal of Cultural Economy makes the role performativity plays in the economy a logical place to start and the debt to Michel Callon (1998) an obvious one to acknowledge. Callon’s idea was that ‘economics does not describe an existing external ‘‘economy’’, but brings that economy into being: economics performs the economy, creating the phenomena it describes’ (MacKenzie & Millo 2003, p. 108). This idea is now recognized by many authors as one of the major contributions to economic sociology (see, e.g., Barry & Slater 2002; Holm 2007; MacKenzie & Millo 2003; MacKenzie 2004, 2007) and has been accompanied by vivid debates across the social sciences about the actual influence of economics and economists over economic practices (e.g. Miller 2000; Callon 2005, 2007; Ferraro et al. 2005; Ghoshal 2005; MacKenzie et al. 2007 and more generally over society and political processes (see, e.g., Bazerman & Malhotra 2006; Fourcade 2001, 2006). But when we remember to take the ‘cultural’ dimension into consideration  that is, when we move beyond economic sociology to the broader intellectual realm of social sciences and humanities at large  we

Journal

Journal of Cultural EconomyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2010

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