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Physical Disability and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide

Physical Disability and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide Interpersonal Theory of Suicide constructs were examined in individuals with physical disabilities, a population identified as having heightened suicidal ideation. Students (N = 184) answered online-based self-report questionnaires. Students with physical disabilities (n = 49) were expected to endorse higher levels of constructs relative to other students (n = 133). Analyses of covariance indicated that those with disabilities reported higher perceived burdensomeness, but not thwarted belongingness, fearlessness about death, or suicidal ideation. Suicide prevention efforts, particularly in university settings, may benefit from focusing on reducing perceived burdensomeness in this population, as these individuals may be at heightened risk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Death Studies Taylor & Francis

Physical Disability and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide

6 pages

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References (31)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1091-7683
eISSN
0748-1187
DOI
10.1080/07481187.2015.1047061
pmid
26079648
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Interpersonal Theory of Suicide constructs were examined in individuals with physical disabilities, a population identified as having heightened suicidal ideation. Students (N = 184) answered online-based self-report questionnaires. Students with physical disabilities (n = 49) were expected to endorse higher levels of constructs relative to other students (n = 133). Analyses of covariance indicated that those with disabilities reported higher perceived burdensomeness, but not thwarted belongingness, fearlessness about death, or suicidal ideation. Suicide prevention efforts, particularly in university settings, may benefit from focusing on reducing perceived burdensomeness in this population, as these individuals may be at heightened risk.

Journal

Death StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 26, 2015

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