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Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Hodgkin's Disease and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Israel

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Hodgkin's... Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has not been examined systematically in long-term survivors of lymphoma. In this study, PTSD and health related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed in 44 patients with Hodgkin's disease <formula>(<italic>n</italic>=8)</formula> or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma <formula>(<italic>n</italic>=36).</formula> Forty-four individuals who had experienced traumatic events as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) as possible triggers for PTSD served as controls. The study participants were administered two questionnaires--the PTSD inventory scale and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) HRQoL instrument measuring physical and mental HRQoL. Full PTSD was defined as meeting the DSM-IV criteria for the diagnosis in all three symptom groups measured on the PTSD inventory scale-intrusion, avoidance and hyper-arousal and partial PTSD as meeting the diagnostic criteria in two of the symptom groups. There was a significant increase in the hyper-arousal scale in the lymphoma survivor group (F 5, <formula><italic>P</italic><0.05</formula>). Overall, full or partial PTSD was found in 14 lymphoma survivors (32%) and in 11 individuals (25%) in the control group (difference not significant). Survivors whose disease had started at an earlier age suffered significantly more intensive intrusion and avoidance symptoms. The lymphoma survivor group had a significantly lower physical HRQoL than the control group independent of PTSD symptoms. In both groups, the presence of PTSD symptoms correlated with a lower HRQoL. These results suggest that lymphoma is a trauma similar to other more accepted definitions of trauma which can lead to PTSD, and is associated with more severe hyper-arousal symptoms. Psychological interventions in the early stages of treatment or follow-up may help reduce the morbidity from PTSD and improve quality of life. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leukemia & Lymphoma Taylor & Francis

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Hodgkin's Disease and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Israel

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2003 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1029-2403
eISSN
1042-8194
DOI
10.1080/1042819031000123573
pmid
14738144
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has not been examined systematically in long-term survivors of lymphoma. In this study, PTSD and health related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed in 44 patients with Hodgkin's disease <formula>(<italic>n</italic>=8)</formula> or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma <formula>(<italic>n</italic>=36).</formula> Forty-four individuals who had experienced traumatic events as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) as possible triggers for PTSD served as controls. The study participants were administered two questionnaires--the PTSD inventory scale and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) HRQoL instrument measuring physical and mental HRQoL. Full PTSD was defined as meeting the DSM-IV criteria for the diagnosis in all three symptom groups measured on the PTSD inventory scale-intrusion, avoidance and hyper-arousal and partial PTSD as meeting the diagnostic criteria in two of the symptom groups. There was a significant increase in the hyper-arousal scale in the lymphoma survivor group (F 5, <formula><italic>P</italic><0.05</formula>). Overall, full or partial PTSD was found in 14 lymphoma survivors (32%) and in 11 individuals (25%) in the control group (difference not significant). Survivors whose disease had started at an earlier age suffered significantly more intensive intrusion and avoidance symptoms. The lymphoma survivor group had a significantly lower physical HRQoL than the control group independent of PTSD symptoms. In both groups, the presence of PTSD symptoms correlated with a lower HRQoL. These results suggest that lymphoma is a trauma similar to other more accepted definitions of trauma which can lead to PTSD, and is associated with more severe hyper-arousal symptoms. Psychological interventions in the early stages of treatment or follow-up may help reduce the morbidity from PTSD and improve quality of life.

Journal

Leukemia & LymphomaTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2003

Keywords: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder; Quality Of Life; Hodgkin's Disease; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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