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"I May be Homeless, But I'm Not Helpless": The Costs and Benefits of Identifying with Homelessness

"I May be Homeless, But I'm Not Helpless": The Costs and Benefits of Identifying... Anecdotal research strongly suggests homeless persons who develop subsistence strategies to survive on the street maintain self-reliance yet are highly unlikely to transition back off the street. The current study empirically tests this assumption. Ninety-seven homeless persons were interviewed, given a spontaneous self-concept description measure, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale(1979). Combing two self-report scores created an “identification with homelessness” score. As predicted, those individuals who identified most highly with the identity of being homeless: (a) used fewer services (were more self-reliant), (b) made fewer attempts to transition off the street, and (c) had higher self-esteem scores than those with low identification scores. These data and additional data assessing the impact of perceived needs on the aforementioned dependent measures are explored. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Self and Identity Taylor & Francis

"I May be Homeless, But I'm Not Helpless": The Costs and Benefits of Identifying with Homelessness

Self and Identity , Volume 1 (1): 10 – Jan 1, 2002
10 pages

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References (19)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1529-8876
eISSN
1529-8868
DOI
10.1080/152988602317232795
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Anecdotal research strongly suggests homeless persons who develop subsistence strategies to survive on the street maintain self-reliance yet are highly unlikely to transition back off the street. The current study empirically tests this assumption. Ninety-seven homeless persons were interviewed, given a spontaneous self-concept description measure, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale(1979). Combing two self-report scores created an “identification with homelessness” score. As predicted, those individuals who identified most highly with the identity of being homeless: (a) used fewer services (were more self-reliant), (b) made fewer attempts to transition off the street, and (c) had higher self-esteem scores than those with low identification scores. These data and additional data assessing the impact of perceived needs on the aforementioned dependent measures are explored.

Journal

Self and IdentityTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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