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Re-inventing Malta's neolithic temples: Contemporary interpretations and agendas

Re-inventing Malta's neolithic temples: Contemporary interpretations and agendas This paper explores the different ways in which Malta's neolithic temples have been interpreted, contested and appropriated by different local and foreign interest groups: those working in the tourist industry, intellectuals and Maltese nationalists, hunters, archaeologists, artists, and participants in the global Goddess movement. The different perspectives are set against "traditional" popular interpretations of the temples. A particular focus of enquiry is the Maltese response to the foreign Goddess pilgrims who have been visiting the sites in increasing numbers over the last decade: do Maltese feel their past is being appropriated, colonized, or commoditized by these visitors? The paper argues that all interpretations or "inventions" of Malta's neolithic past, whether competing or colluding, can be seen to be governed by the particular social, political, religious or economic agendas of their creators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History and Anthropology Taylor & Francis

Re-inventing Malta's neolithic temples: Contemporary interpretations and agendas

History and Anthropology , Volume 13 (1): 21 – Jan 1, 2002
21 pages

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References (58)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1477-2612
eISSN
0275-7206
DOI
10.1080/02757200290002879
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the different ways in which Malta's neolithic temples have been interpreted, contested and appropriated by different local and foreign interest groups: those working in the tourist industry, intellectuals and Maltese nationalists, hunters, archaeologists, artists, and participants in the global Goddess movement. The different perspectives are set against "traditional" popular interpretations of the temples. A particular focus of enquiry is the Maltese response to the foreign Goddess pilgrims who have been visiting the sites in increasing numbers over the last decade: do Maltese feel their past is being appropriated, colonized, or commoditized by these visitors? The paper argues that all interpretations or "inventions" of Malta's neolithic past, whether competing or colluding, can be seen to be governed by the particular social, political, religious or economic agendas of their creators.

Journal

History and AnthropologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2002

Keywords: Ethnoarcheology; History; Politics; Identities

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