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Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java

Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 301 convincingly demonstrates the value of a hybrid approach to the anthropology of television. Luka ´ cs’ approach is particularly enlightening to a recent problem in visual media study; that of how to write on the increasingly fragmented nature of production and viewing practices. JENNY ALLAN School of Oriental and African Studies University of London # 2012, Jenny Allan http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2012.680708 KAREN STRASSLER Durham and London, Duke University Press, 2010 xx 375 pp., bibliography, index, ISBN: 978-0-8223-4611-1, US$ 26.95 (paperback) Karen Strassler’s Refracted Visions explores a particular field of photography in Indonesia by focusing on its entanglements with the country’s modern (hi)stories. Her approach is genuinely anthropological: she follows pictures to where they are placed, displayed or kept safe in Javanese homes, accompanies photographers to witness the production of images, and visits photo studios, their owners and customers, in and around the Central Javanese City of Yogyakarta. She carefully records the atmosphere, emotions and memories that are evoked by particular pictures or by the sites of their (re)production. The ethnographic dimensions of Refracted Visions are informed by a theoretical interest in modernity and nationalism that echoes the Cornell ‘school’ in Indonesian studies with which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology Taylor & Francis

Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology , Volume 13 (3): 3 – Jun 1, 2012
3 pages

Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java

Abstract

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 301 convincingly demonstrates the value of a hybrid approach to the anthropology of television. Luka ´ cs’ approach is particularly enlightening to a recent problem in visual media study; that of how to write on the increasingly fragmented nature of production and viewing practices. JENNY ALLAN School of Oriental and African Studies University of London # 2012, Jenny Allan http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2012.680708 KAREN STRASSLER...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Martin Slama
ISSN
1740-9314
eISSN
1444-2213
DOI
10.1080/14442213.2012.680710
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 301 convincingly demonstrates the value of a hybrid approach to the anthropology of television. Luka ´ cs’ approach is particularly enlightening to a recent problem in visual media study; that of how to write on the increasingly fragmented nature of production and viewing practices. JENNY ALLAN School of Oriental and African Studies University of London # 2012, Jenny Allan http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2012.680708 KAREN STRASSLER Durham and London, Duke University Press, 2010 xx 375 pp., bibliography, index, ISBN: 978-0-8223-4611-1, US$ 26.95 (paperback) Karen Strassler’s Refracted Visions explores a particular field of photography in Indonesia by focusing on its entanglements with the country’s modern (hi)stories. Her approach is genuinely anthropological: she follows pictures to where they are placed, displayed or kept safe in Javanese homes, accompanies photographers to witness the production of images, and visits photo studios, their owners and customers, in and around the Central Javanese City of Yogyakarta. She carefully records the atmosphere, emotions and memories that are evoked by particular pictures or by the sites of their (re)production. The ethnographic dimensions of Refracted Visions are informed by a theoretical interest in modernity and nationalism that echoes the Cornell ‘school’ in Indonesian studies with which

Journal

The Asia Pacific Journal of AnthropologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2012

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