Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Religiosity, Relationships and Consumption: A Study of Church Going in Ireland

Religiosity, Relationships and Consumption: A Study of Church Going in Ireland Business‐to‐consumer relationships have been over‐conceptualised, but poorly understood in terms of the social factors that motivate or inhibit the development of such relationships. This paper seeks to integrate three streams of literature, buyer‐seller relationships, social relationships, and religiosity and develops a framework in which declining levels of participation in organised religion may be conceptualised as a failing relationship, which has been partially superseded by commercial relationships. This study uses an existential phenomenological approach to explore the complementarity or substitutability of individuals' relationships based on religion with those based on consumption. A survey of a sample of active and lapsed churchgoers in Ireland found mixed evidence of commercial relationships acting as a substitute for traditional religious‐based relationships. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Consumption Markets and Culture Taylor & Francis

Religiosity, Relationships and Consumption: A Study of Church Going in Ireland

19 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/religiosity-relationships-and-consumption-a-study-of-church-going-in-D6dLNak00N

References (54)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1477-223X
eISSN
1025-3866
DOI
10.1080/10253860601116494
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Business‐to‐consumer relationships have been over‐conceptualised, but poorly understood in terms of the social factors that motivate or inhibit the development of such relationships. This paper seeks to integrate three streams of literature, buyer‐seller relationships, social relationships, and religiosity and develops a framework in which declining levels of participation in organised religion may be conceptualised as a failing relationship, which has been partially superseded by commercial relationships. This study uses an existential phenomenological approach to explore the complementarity or substitutability of individuals' relationships based on religion with those based on consumption. A survey of a sample of active and lapsed churchgoers in Ireland found mixed evidence of commercial relationships acting as a substitute for traditional religious‐based relationships.

Journal

Consumption Markets and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2007

Keywords: Religion; Secularisation; Relationship Marketing; Buyer‐seller Relationships; Catholic Church; Ireland

There are no references for this article.