Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Review Articles

Review Articles l a n d s c a p e s (2008), 1, pp. 82 –109 David Austin, Acts of Perception: A Study of Barnard Castle in Teesdale (2007) English Heritage and the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, Research Report 6 . Two volumes, 708 pages, 243 illustrations, ISBN 0951038850, £60. Why should a journal devoted to landscape studies review a report on the excavation of a guardianship monument (1974–81)? Your editor (PAS) asked this reviewer to consider whether David Austin addresses themes identified in recent books on castles and landscape, like those by Oliver Creighton and Rob Liddiard (the simple answer is no, incidentally: this report was completed c. 2000 and therefore takes no account of more recent developments in castle studies). But, with respect to your editor, this may be the wrong question anyway. Austin’s report is not only sui generis, it is a worked example of a personal, idiosyncratic, philosophy of archaeology and history, and of the connections between both and ancient buildings and landscapes, which is of much greater richness, sophistication and complexity than any of the relatively simple relationships explored so far by the rapidly growing band of revisionists now infiltrating castle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscapes Taylor & Francis

Review Articles

,
Landscapes , Volume 9 (1): 9 – Jan 1, 2008
9 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/review-articles-1KSXS7J8at

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2008 Maney Publishing
ISSN
2040-8153
eISSN
1466-2035
DOI
10.1179/lan.2008.9.1.82
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

l a n d s c a p e s (2008), 1, pp. 82 –109 David Austin, Acts of Perception: A Study of Barnard Castle in Teesdale (2007) English Heritage and the Architectural and Archaeological Society of Durham and Northumberland, Research Report 6 . Two volumes, 708 pages, 243 illustrations, ISBN 0951038850, £60. Why should a journal devoted to landscape studies review a report on the excavation of a guardianship monument (1974–81)? Your editor (PAS) asked this reviewer to consider whether David Austin addresses themes identified in recent books on castles and landscape, like those by Oliver Creighton and Rob Liddiard (the simple answer is no, incidentally: this report was completed c. 2000 and therefore takes no account of more recent developments in castle studies). But, with respect to your editor, this may be the wrong question anyway. Austin’s report is not only sui generis, it is a worked example of a personal, idiosyncratic, philosophy of archaeology and history, and of the connections between both and ancient buildings and landscapes, which is of much greater richness, sophistication and complexity than any of the relatively simple relationships explored so far by the rapidly growing band of revisionists now infiltrating castle

Journal

LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2008

References