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Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate

Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate 598 Journal of Higher Education Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific De­ bate, by Larry Laudan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. vii + 149 pp. $8.95 (paper) RICHARD WHITLEY, University of Manchester This book begins with the assertion that both philosophers and sociologists have concentrated on explaining either the existence of consensus among scientists or, more recently, dissensus and conflict without attempting to develop theories which would take both consensus and conflict as problem­ atic. Given the ubiquity of both in modern science, Larry Laudan sets him­ self the task of formulating a single unified theory of scientific rationality that would be able to explain why scientists can quite rationally agree and disagree about facts and theories. After briefly describing the Leibnizian ideal of impartial rules of evidence for resolving disputes over theories and facts and commensurate sociological accounts of normative integration in science, Laudan criticises Kuhn and recent sociological discussions of controversies for ignoring the processes by which consensus is created and maintained in the sciences. His own account of how scientists reach agreement is prefaced by an analysis of what he calls the simple hierarchical model of rational consensus formation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Higher Education Taylor & Francis

Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 58 (5): 3 – Sep 1, 1987

Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 58 (5): 3 – Sep 1, 1987

Abstract

598 Journal of Higher Education Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific De­ bate, by Larry Laudan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. vii + 149 pp. $8.95 (paper) RICHARD WHITLEY, University of Manchester This book begins with the assertion that both philosophers and sociologists have concentrated on explaining either the existence of consensus among scientists or, more recently, dissensus and conflict without attempting to develop theories which would take both consensus and conflict as problem­ atic. Given the ubiquity of both in modern science, Larry Laudan sets him­ self the task of formulating a single unified theory of scientific rationality that would be able to explain why scientists can quite rationally agree and disagree about facts and theories. After briefly describing the Leibnizian ideal of impartial rules of evidence for resolving disputes over theories and facts and commensurate sociological accounts of normative integration in science, Laudan criticises Kuhn and recent sociological discussions of controversies for ignoring the processes by which consensus is created and maintained in the sciences. His own account of how scientists reach agreement is prefaced by an analysis of what he calls the simple hierarchical model of rational consensus formation

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Ohio State University Press
ISSN
1538-4640
eISSN
0022-1546
DOI
10.1080/00221546.1987.11778285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

598 Journal of Higher Education Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific De­ bate, by Larry Laudan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. vii + 149 pp. $8.95 (paper) RICHARD WHITLEY, University of Manchester This book begins with the assertion that both philosophers and sociologists have concentrated on explaining either the existence of consensus among scientists or, more recently, dissensus and conflict without attempting to develop theories which would take both consensus and conflict as problem­ atic. Given the ubiquity of both in modern science, Larry Laudan sets him­ self the task of formulating a single unified theory of scientific rationality that would be able to explain why scientists can quite rationally agree and disagree about facts and theories. After briefly describing the Leibnizian ideal of impartial rules of evidence for resolving disputes over theories and facts and commensurate sociological accounts of normative integration in science, Laudan criticises Kuhn and recent sociological discussions of controversies for ignoring the processes by which consensus is created and maintained in the sciences. His own account of how scientists reach agreement is prefaced by an analysis of what he calls the simple hierarchical model of rational consensus formation

Journal

The Journal of Higher EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1987

References