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Science, technology and Industrialisation in Africa

Science, technology and Industrialisation in Africa ATUL WAD Science, Technology and Industrialisation in Africa This paper is an attempt to examine some aspects of science and technology in African development. It will review various approaches to the analysis of science and technology in developing countries and the light they cast on the situation in Africa. A central contention in the paper is that part of the problem of science and technology in African development is an inadequate understanding of the problem itself. In particular, it is argued that the parameters used to define the problem have tended to be too narrow and that there is a need to situate science and technology within a broader political and economic framework with an emphasis on the role and structure of the State in the process of industrialisation. There has recently been a surge in interest in the role of science and technology in African development, not only by governments and regional bodies, but by social scientists preoccupied with the broader question of socioeconomic development and change in Africa. On one level, there are the formal expressions of concern with the problem, notably the section on science and technology of the Lagos Plan of Action.1 This concern is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Third World Quarterly Taylor & Francis

Science, technology and Industrialisation in Africa

Third World Quarterly , Volume 6 (2): 24 – Apr 1, 1984

Science, technology and Industrialisation in Africa

Third World Quarterly , Volume 6 (2): 24 – Apr 1, 1984

Abstract

ATUL WAD Science, Technology and Industrialisation in Africa This paper is an attempt to examine some aspects of science and technology in African development. It will review various approaches to the analysis of science and technology in developing countries and the light they cast on the situation in Africa. A central contention in the paper is that part of the problem of science and technology in African development is an inadequate understanding of the problem itself. In particular, it is argued that the parameters used to define the problem have tended to be too narrow and that there is a need to situate science and technology within a broader political and economic framework with an emphasis on the role and structure of the State in the process of industrialisation. There has recently been a surge in interest in the role of science and technology in African development, not only by governments and regional bodies, but by social scientists preoccupied with the broader question of socioeconomic development and change in Africa. On one level, there are the formal expressions of concern with the problem, notably the section on science and technology of the Lagos Plan of Action.1 This concern is

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References (21)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1360-2241
eISSN
0143-6597
DOI
10.1080/01436598408419771
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ATUL WAD Science, Technology and Industrialisation in Africa This paper is an attempt to examine some aspects of science and technology in African development. It will review various approaches to the analysis of science and technology in developing countries and the light they cast on the situation in Africa. A central contention in the paper is that part of the problem of science and technology in African development is an inadequate understanding of the problem itself. In particular, it is argued that the parameters used to define the problem have tended to be too narrow and that there is a need to situate science and technology within a broader political and economic framework with an emphasis on the role and structure of the State in the process of industrialisation. There has recently been a surge in interest in the role of science and technology in African development, not only by governments and regional bodies, but by social scientists preoccupied with the broader question of socioeconomic development and change in Africa. On one level, there are the formal expressions of concern with the problem, notably the section on science and technology of the Lagos Plan of Action.1 This concern is

Journal

Third World QuarterlyTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 1984

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