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Self-Estimates of Ability in Men and Women

Self-Estimates of Ability in Men and Women The Journal of Social Psychology, 1997, 137(4), 540-541 Self-Estimates of Ability in Men and Women MARK BENNETT Department of Psychology University of Dundee, Scotland ACCORDING TO PREVIOUS RESEARCH, the IQ self-estimates of men are significantly higher than those of women (Bennett, 1996; Hogan, 1978). My aim in this study was to determine whether these findings reflect a general dif- ference between the sexes in estimating ability or whether the discrepancies are ability specific. The participants were 160 British undergraduate students (1 10 women, mean age = 23.1 years; 50 men, mean age = 23.66 years) enrolled in a psychol- ogy module as part of an introductory program in the faculty of either Arts or Sci- ences. Testing took place within six small-group laboratory classes on method- ology. Participants were required to estimate their ability with reference to each of Gardner’s (1 993) fundamental human intelligences. Thus, taking 100 as an average score, participants were asked to indicate their likely scores in linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, personal, bodily-kinesthetic, and musical abili- ties. Each competency had been briefly defined in the terms outlined by Gardner. Participants provided their estimates anonymously on a standard scoring sheet, along with information about their age and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Social Psychology Taylor & Francis

Self-Estimates of Ability in Men and Women

The Journal of Social Psychology , Volume 137 (4): 2 – Aug 1, 1997
2 pages

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References (3)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-1183
eISSN
0022-4545
DOI
10.1080/00224549709595475
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal of Social Psychology, 1997, 137(4), 540-541 Self-Estimates of Ability in Men and Women MARK BENNETT Department of Psychology University of Dundee, Scotland ACCORDING TO PREVIOUS RESEARCH, the IQ self-estimates of men are significantly higher than those of women (Bennett, 1996; Hogan, 1978). My aim in this study was to determine whether these findings reflect a general dif- ference between the sexes in estimating ability or whether the discrepancies are ability specific. The participants were 160 British undergraduate students (1 10 women, mean age = 23.1 years; 50 men, mean age = 23.66 years) enrolled in a psychol- ogy module as part of an introductory program in the faculty of either Arts or Sci- ences. Testing took place within six small-group laboratory classes on method- ology. Participants were required to estimate their ability with reference to each of Gardner’s (1 993) fundamental human intelligences. Thus, taking 100 as an average score, participants were asked to indicate their likely scores in linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, personal, bodily-kinesthetic, and musical abili- ties. Each competency had been briefly defined in the terms outlined by Gardner. Participants provided their estimates anonymously on a standard scoring sheet, along with information about their age and

Journal

The Journal of Social PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 1997

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