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Shaping new ideas: A case study on a library developed 3D model service for university instruction

Shaping new ideas: A case study on a library developed 3D model service for university instruction Abstract 3D printers represent a significant financial investment for academic libraries. The development of makerspaces and other library provided services centered around this technology is a testament to the role these technologies can play in offering new resources to students. However, given the investment it behooves the academic library to work to develop new models of applying 3D printing in other areas in order to maximize these resources. One way in which the academic library can extend the use of 3D printers is by offering them as a mechanism for creating custom designed 3D models for use in the classroom. By closing the skills gap in providing both the printer and the ability to design objects for faculty, academic libraries can open a new avenue for providing instructional services on campus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Access Services Taylor & Francis

Shaping new ideas: A case study on a library developed 3D model service for university instruction

Shaping new ideas: A case study on a library developed 3D model service for university instruction

Journal Of Access Services , Volume 17 (3): 11 – Jul 2, 2020

Abstract

Abstract 3D printers represent a significant financial investment for academic libraries. The development of makerspaces and other library provided services centered around this technology is a testament to the role these technologies can play in offering new resources to students. However, given the investment it behooves the academic library to work to develop new models of applying 3D printing in other areas in order to maximize these resources. One way in which the academic library can extend the use of 3D printers is by offering them as a mechanism for creating custom designed 3D models for use in the classroom. By closing the skills gap in providing both the printer and the ability to design objects for faculty, academic libraries can open a new avenue for providing instructional services on campus.

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References (14)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1536-7975
eISSN
1536-7967
DOI
10.1080/15367967.2020.1741375
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract 3D printers represent a significant financial investment for academic libraries. The development of makerspaces and other library provided services centered around this technology is a testament to the role these technologies can play in offering new resources to students. However, given the investment it behooves the academic library to work to develop new models of applying 3D printing in other areas in order to maximize these resources. One way in which the academic library can extend the use of 3D printers is by offering them as a mechanism for creating custom designed 3D models for use in the classroom. By closing the skills gap in providing both the printer and the ability to design objects for faculty, academic libraries can open a new avenue for providing instructional services on campus.

Journal

Journal Of Access ServicesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 2, 2020

Keywords: 3D printing; access services; makerspace; user services

There are no references for this article.