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Sleep Management Strategies Among Medical Students At the University of Otago

Sleep Management Strategies Among Medical Students At the University of Otago Objectives We aim to investigate factors which might affect the sleep of medical students, and how they currently manage their sleep. Methods An online survey was sent to medical students at the University of Otago. Results After adjusting for gender, ethnicity and age, depressive symptoms (Mild: odds ratio (OR) = 6.3; Moderate: OR = 18.1; Severe: OR = 15.6), and sleep hygiene (OR = 1.07) were associated with insomnia symptoms. Commonly endorsed strategies for sleep management by students were undertaking regular exercise (80.1%), having consistent sleep-wake time (71.3%), and limiting caffeine intake (70.3%). Few were willing to see a clinician (23.4%) or take medication (22.3%). Participants with insomnia symptoms were more likely to prefer limiting their alcohol intake (OR = 1.8), limiting daytime naps (OR = 1.5), seeing clinicians (OR = 1.9), and taking sleep medication (OR = 4.0), but less likely to prefer avoiding intense work (OR = .71) or minimizing using electronics (OR = .60) close to bedtime than those without insomnia symptoms. High sleep self-efficacy was associated with lower odds for having insomnia symptoms (OR = .74 (.70, .77)). Conclusions Increased awareness and greater resources are needed to support the sleep health of medical students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Sleep Medicine Taylor & Francis

Sleep Management Strategies Among Medical Students At the University of Otago

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1540-2010
eISSN
1540-2002
DOI
10.1080/15402002.2022.2127723
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives We aim to investigate factors which might affect the sleep of medical students, and how they currently manage their sleep. Methods An online survey was sent to medical students at the University of Otago. Results After adjusting for gender, ethnicity and age, depressive symptoms (Mild: odds ratio (OR) = 6.3; Moderate: OR = 18.1; Severe: OR = 15.6), and sleep hygiene (OR = 1.07) were associated with insomnia symptoms. Commonly endorsed strategies for sleep management by students were undertaking regular exercise (80.1%), having consistent sleep-wake time (71.3%), and limiting caffeine intake (70.3%). Few were willing to see a clinician (23.4%) or take medication (22.3%). Participants with insomnia symptoms were more likely to prefer limiting their alcohol intake (OR = 1.8), limiting daytime naps (OR = 1.5), seeing clinicians (OR = 1.9), and taking sleep medication (OR = 4.0), but less likely to prefer avoiding intense work (OR = .71) or minimizing using electronics (OR = .60) close to bedtime than those without insomnia symptoms. High sleep self-efficacy was associated with lower odds for having insomnia symptoms (OR = .74 (.70, .77)). Conclusions Increased awareness and greater resources are needed to support the sleep health of medical students.

Journal

Behavioral Sleep MedicineTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 4, 2023

References