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Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies 439 Rob Nixon Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2011. 370 pp. (hbk) 978-0674049307 Even if it is not quite accurate to say that the emergent subfield of postcolonial ecocriticism is the house that Nixon built, his essay ‘‘Environmentalism and Postcolonialism’’ has certainly been a seminal provocation for one of postcolonial studies’ most vibrant new directions. When this essay was published in 2005, Nixon was able to point to a conspicuous mutual silence between the two discourses; the intervening years (particularly the past two) have seen the publication of several important books and edited collections, by scholars including Liz DeLoughrey and George Handley, Graham Huggan and Helen Tiffin, and Pablo Mukherjee, that break (and complicate) this silence. Anyone engaging postcolonial ecocriticism today must point to Nixon’s essay (revised as the final chapter of Slow Violence) as an opening salvo—perhaps not quite as ground-breaking as his mentor Edward Said’s Orientalism , but hugely influential nonetheless. Thus, one can hardly overstate the importance of this work, even if (in a temporal torsion Nixon would appreciate) its impact has been felt long before the book’s publication. ‘‘Slow violence’’ is the kind of concept so indispensable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies Taylor & Francis

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

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References (5)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1543-1304
eISSN
1753-3171
DOI
10.1080/17533171.2012.716933
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies 439 Rob Nixon Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2011. 370 pp. (hbk) 978-0674049307 Even if it is not quite accurate to say that the emergent subfield of postcolonial ecocriticism is the house that Nixon built, his essay ‘‘Environmentalism and Postcolonialism’’ has certainly been a seminal provocation for one of postcolonial studies’ most vibrant new directions. When this essay was published in 2005, Nixon was able to point to a conspicuous mutual silence between the two discourses; the intervening years (particularly the past two) have seen the publication of several important books and edited collections, by scholars including Liz DeLoughrey and George Handley, Graham Huggan and Helen Tiffin, and Pablo Mukherjee, that break (and complicate) this silence. Anyone engaging postcolonial ecocriticism today must point to Nixon’s essay (revised as the final chapter of Slow Violence) as an opening salvo—perhaps not quite as ground-breaking as his mentor Edward Said’s Orientalism , but hugely influential nonetheless. Thus, one can hardly overstate the importance of this work, even if (in a temporal torsion Nixon would appreciate) its impact has been felt long before the book’s publication. ‘‘Slow violence’’ is the kind of concept so indispensable

Journal

Safundi: The Journal of South African and American StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2012

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