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Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects

Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects ROBERT A. FURMAN, M.D. IN THIS PAPER VERBALIZATION REFERS TO COMMUNICATION BY words, not just to the use of words. This is in contrast both with the random, purposeless use of words which are not in­ tended for communication as well as with the more familiar forms of nonverbal communication. Verbalization is often as­ sumed to refer to verbalization of affects as evidenced by one dictionary definition: "to verbalize-to express in words; he couldn't express his feelings" (Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition 1966). Specifically this paper is directed to that aspect of verbalization which, pre­ ceded by the naming of objects, deals with communication of feelings and needs. In her classic paper "Some Thoughts about the Role of Ver­ balization in Early Childhood," Anny Katan (1961) presented three basic conclusions. The first stated that the verbalization Faculty Member and Training Analyst at The Cleveland Psychoanalytic Institute; Director, Cleveland Center for Research in Child Development; and Assistant Clinical Professor of Child Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. This paper served as the basis for the Keynote Address at the Annual Meeting of the New York State http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child Taylor & Francis

Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects

The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child , Volume 33 (1): 25 – Jan 1, 1978

Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects

The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child , Volume 33 (1): 25 – Jan 1, 1978

Abstract

Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects ROBERT A. FURMAN, M.D. IN THIS PAPER VERBALIZATION REFERS TO COMMUNICATION BY words, not just to the use of words. This is in contrast both with the random, purposeless use of words which are not in­ tended for communication as well as with the more familiar forms of nonverbal communication. Verbalization is often as­ sumed to refer to verbalization of affects as evidenced by one dictionary definition: "to verbalize-to express in words; he couldn't express his feelings" (Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition 1966). Specifically this paper is directed to that aspect of verbalization which, pre­ ceded by the naming of objects, deals with communication of feelings and needs. In her classic paper "Some Thoughts about the Role of Ver­ balization in Early Childhood," Anny Katan (1961) presented three basic conclusions. The first stated that the verbalization Faculty Member and Training Analyst at The Cleveland Psychoanalytic Institute; Director, Cleveland Center for Research in Child Development; and Assistant Clinical Professor of Child Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. This paper served as the basis for the Keynote Address at the Annual Meeting of the New York State

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References (6)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1978 Albert J. Solnit, Ruth S. Eissler, Anna Freud, Marianne Kris, and Peter B. Neubauer
ISSN
2474-3356
eISSN
0079-7308
DOI
10.1080/00797308.1978.11822976
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Some Developmental Aspects of the Verbalization of Affects ROBERT A. FURMAN, M.D. IN THIS PAPER VERBALIZATION REFERS TO COMMUNICATION BY words, not just to the use of words. This is in contrast both with the random, purposeless use of words which are not in­ tended for communication as well as with the more familiar forms of nonverbal communication. Verbalization is often as­ sumed to refer to verbalization of affects as evidenced by one dictionary definition: "to verbalize-to express in words; he couldn't express his feelings" (Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition 1966). Specifically this paper is directed to that aspect of verbalization which, pre­ ceded by the naming of objects, deals with communication of feelings and needs. In her classic paper "Some Thoughts about the Role of Ver­ balization in Early Childhood," Anny Katan (1961) presented three basic conclusions. The first stated that the verbalization Faculty Member and Training Analyst at The Cleveland Psychoanalytic Institute; Director, Cleveland Center for Research in Child Development; and Assistant Clinical Professor of Child Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. This paper served as the basis for the Keynote Address at the Annual Meeting of the New York State

Journal

The Psychoanalytic Study of the ChildTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1978

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