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Starstruck: Cosmic Visions in Science, Religion, and Folklore

Starstruck: Cosmic Visions in Science, Religion, and Folklore 230 Book reviews Phadrea Ponds Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA), Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 2150 Centre Ave., Building C, Fort Collins, CO 80526, United States E-mail address: pondsp@usgs.gov doi:10.1016/j.soscij.2008.12.019 By Albert A. Harrison; New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007, 231 pp. Many social scientists, me included, believe that humanity is in an era of transition. It is generally agreed that, with roots in the nineteenth century, it began in earnest in the early twentieth century at the time of the First World War and the Mexican, Chinese, and Russian revolutions. The changeover is generated by a new intellectual paradigm resting on the ideas of Marx, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, and Heisenberg among others and unsettlingly characterized by the apparent absence of absolutes. As to what the outcomes of the transition are or will be, there is yet little surety or agreement. Similarly to such times of accelerated change in the past (i.e. Renaissance), it is evidenced not only by anxiety, destruction, and uncertainty, but also exceptional creativity, new growth, and progress. It is embraced by few and recoiled from by many. Minimally, it is a time of reconsideration and redefinition. In his latest book http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Science Journal Taylor & Francis

Starstruck: Cosmic Visions in Science, Religion, and Folklore

Social Science Journal , Volume 46 (1): 2 – Mar 1, 2009

Starstruck: Cosmic Visions in Science, Religion, and Folklore

Social Science Journal , Volume 46 (1): 2 – Mar 1, 2009

Abstract

230 Book reviews Phadrea Ponds Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA), Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 2150 Centre Ave., Building C, Fort Collins, CO 80526, United States E-mail address: pondsp@usgs.gov doi:10.1016/j.soscij.2008.12.019 By Albert A. Harrison; New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007, 231 pp. Many social scientists, me included, believe that humanity is in an era of transition. It is generally agreed that, with roots in the nineteenth century, it began in earnest in the early twentieth century at the time of the First World War and the Mexican, Chinese, and Russian revolutions. The changeover is generated by a new intellectual paradigm resting on the ideas of Marx, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, and Heisenberg among others and unsettlingly characterized by the apparent absence of absolutes. As to what the outcomes of the transition are or will be, there is yet little surety or agreement. Similarly to such times of accelerated change in the past (i.e. Renaissance), it is evidenced not only by anxiety, destruction, and uncertainty, but also exceptional creativity, new growth, and progress. It is embraced by few and recoiled from by many. Minimally, it is a time of reconsideration and redefinition. In his latest book

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2008 Western Social Science Association
ISSN
1873-5355
eISSN
0362-3319
DOI
10.1016/j.soscij.2008.12.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

230 Book reviews Phadrea Ponds Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA), Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 2150 Centre Ave., Building C, Fort Collins, CO 80526, United States E-mail address: pondsp@usgs.gov doi:10.1016/j.soscij.2008.12.019 By Albert A. Harrison; New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007, 231 pp. Many social scientists, me included, believe that humanity is in an era of transition. It is generally agreed that, with roots in the nineteenth century, it began in earnest in the early twentieth century at the time of the First World War and the Mexican, Chinese, and Russian revolutions. The changeover is generated by a new intellectual paradigm resting on the ideas of Marx, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, and Heisenberg among others and unsettlingly characterized by the apparent absence of absolutes. As to what the outcomes of the transition are or will be, there is yet little surety or agreement. Similarly to such times of accelerated change in the past (i.e. Renaissance), it is evidenced not only by anxiety, destruction, and uncertainty, but also exceptional creativity, new growth, and progress. It is embraced by few and recoiled from by many. Minimally, it is a time of reconsideration and redefinition. In his latest book

Journal

Social Science JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.