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Still blaming the consumer? Geographies of responsibility in domestic food safety practices

Still blaming the consumer? Geographies of responsibility in domestic food safety practices Drawing upon qualitative and ethnographic data collected in the UK, this paper discusses how public discourses and concerns about food safety are negotiated into everyday domestic kitchen practices. While many participants demonstrated ‘behaviours’ or ‘practices’ which could be seen to contravene or fall short of official guidelines, this does not necessarily indicate ‘ignorance’ or lack of responsibility on the part of consumers. Indeed, when explored in detail, participants presented a range of reasons for engaging in what the UK Food Standards Agency regard as ‘risky’ practices. Their explanations point toward an understanding of the distribution of domestic responsibility in which a number of stakeholders are implicated, while simultaneously acknowledging their role as final arbiters of food safety in the home. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Public Health Taylor & Francis

Still blaming the consumer? Geographies of responsibility in domestic food safety practices

Critical Public Health , Volume 24 (1): 16 – Jan 2, 2014
16 pages

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References (103)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1469-3682
eISSN
0958-1596
DOI
10.1080/09581596.2013.791387
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drawing upon qualitative and ethnographic data collected in the UK, this paper discusses how public discourses and concerns about food safety are negotiated into everyday domestic kitchen practices. While many participants demonstrated ‘behaviours’ or ‘practices’ which could be seen to contravene or fall short of official guidelines, this does not necessarily indicate ‘ignorance’ or lack of responsibility on the part of consumers. Indeed, when explored in detail, participants presented a range of reasons for engaging in what the UK Food Standards Agency regard as ‘risky’ practices. Their explanations point toward an understanding of the distribution of domestic responsibility in which a number of stakeholders are implicated, while simultaneously acknowledging their role as final arbiters of food safety in the home.

Journal

Critical Public HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2014

Keywords: food safety; consumer practices; responsibility

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