Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Strong Like My Mama: The Legacy of “Strength,” Depression, and Suicidality in African American Women

Strong Like My Mama: The Legacy of “Strength,” Depression, and Suicidality in African American Women AbstractThe present study reframes the strong Black woman (SBW) identity as an intersectional cultural coping style that impacts experiences of depression and suicide for African American women in the United States. This study draws on previous findings that distilled affect regulation, self-reliance, and caretaking as SBW components. The researcher explored the SBW as a moderator of the existent relationship between depression and suicide in African American women. Findings indicated that depressed African American women who utilize this coping style, particularly affect regulation, demonstrated increased risk for suicidality. The researcher discusses implications for research and treatment options from a multicultural, feminist framework. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women & Therapy Taylor & Francis

Strong Like My Mama: The Legacy of “Strength,” Depression, and Suicidality in African American Women

Women & Therapy , Volume 42 (3-4): 24 – Oct 2, 2019

Strong Like My Mama: The Legacy of “Strength,” Depression, and Suicidality in African American Women

Women & Therapy , Volume 42 (3-4): 24 – Oct 2, 2019

Abstract

AbstractThe present study reframes the strong Black woman (SBW) identity as an intersectional cultural coping style that impacts experiences of depression and suicide for African American women in the United States. This study draws on previous findings that distilled affect regulation, self-reliance, and caretaking as SBW components. The researcher explored the SBW as a moderator of the existent relationship between depression and suicide in African American women. Findings indicated that depressed African American women who utilize this coping style, particularly affect regulation, demonstrated increased risk for suicidality. The researcher discusses implications for research and treatment options from a multicultural, feminist framework.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/strong-like-my-mama-the-legacy-of-strength-depression-and-suicidality-moccHowFY5

References (69)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1541-0315
eISSN
0270-3149
DOI
10.1080/02703149.2019.1622909
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe present study reframes the strong Black woman (SBW) identity as an intersectional cultural coping style that impacts experiences of depression and suicide for African American women in the United States. This study draws on previous findings that distilled affect regulation, self-reliance, and caretaking as SBW components. The researcher explored the SBW as a moderator of the existent relationship between depression and suicide in African American women. Findings indicated that depressed African American women who utilize this coping style, particularly affect regulation, demonstrated increased risk for suicidality. The researcher discusses implications for research and treatment options from a multicultural, feminist framework.

Journal

Women & TherapyTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2019

Keywords: African American; culture; depression; psychology; strength; strong Black woman; suicide; women

There are no references for this article.