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Textural analysis of high resolution imagery to quantify bush encroachment in Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa, 1955-1996

Textural analysis of high resolution imagery to quantify bush encroachment in Madikwe Game... Fire suppression associated with decades of cattle grazing can result in bush encroachment in savannas. Textural analyses of historical, high resolution images was used to characterize bush densities across a South African study landscape. A control site, where vegetation was assumed to have changed minimally for the duration of the image record (1955-1996), was used to standardize textural values between multidate images. Standardized textural values were then converted to estimates of percent woody canopy cover using a simple linear regression model. Results indicate a 30% relative increase in percent woody cover between 1955 and 1996. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Remote Sensing Taylor & Francis

Textural analysis of high resolution imagery to quantify bush encroachment in Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa, 1955-1996

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-5901
DOI
10.1080/01431160119030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fire suppression associated with decades of cattle grazing can result in bush encroachment in savannas. Textural analyses of historical, high resolution images was used to characterize bush densities across a South African study landscape. A control site, where vegetation was assumed to have changed minimally for the duration of the image record (1955-1996), was used to standardize textural values between multidate images. Standardized textural values were then converted to estimates of percent woody canopy cover using a simple linear regression model. Results indicate a 30% relative increase in percent woody cover between 1955 and 1996.

Journal

International Journal of Remote SensingTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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