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The Anglo-Saxon Village of West Stow: An Interim Report of the Excavations 1965–8

The Anglo-Saxon Village of West Stow: An Interim Report of the Excavations 1965–8 IN THE early 1850s a pagan Saxon cemetery was discovered on West Stow Heath by men ‘raising gravel for b alias f for barges operating on the River Lark. The site was explored by several local antiquaries and the spoils divided, some eventually reaching the Moyse's Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds, and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. The report on these discoveries which was published1 does not give their precise location; the evidence suggests the possibility of two cemeteries. The site of the settlement was never looked for and remained undisturbed only a few hundred yards away on the N. bank of the Lark.In 1947 Mr. Basil Brown reported that Anglo-Saxon huts were being destroyed by gravel-working on property belonging to the Bury St. Edmunds Corporation's sewage farm and I subsequently recorded three of the huts. In later years Miss Vera Evison of Birkbeck College, London, investigated the N. edge of the site and established that a considerable area of settlement still existed.z The designation of the whole area for use as the Corporation's rubbish-tip provided the opportunity for the entire site to be examined by the Ministry of Public Building and Works in 1965. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medieval Archaeology Taylor & Francis

The Anglo-Saxon Village of West Stow: An Interim Report of the Excavations 1965–8

Medieval Archaeology , Volume 13 (1): 20 – Jan 1, 1969

The Anglo-Saxon Village of West Stow: An Interim Report of the Excavations 1965–8

Medieval Archaeology , Volume 13 (1): 20 – Jan 1, 1969

Abstract

IN THE early 1850s a pagan Saxon cemetery was discovered on West Stow Heath by men ‘raising gravel for b alias f for barges operating on the River Lark. The site was explored by several local antiquaries and the spoils divided, some eventually reaching the Moyse's Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds, and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. The report on these discoveries which was published1 does not give their precise location; the evidence suggests the possibility of two cemeteries. The site of the settlement was never looked for and remained undisturbed only a few hundred yards away on the N. bank of the Lark.In 1947 Mr. Basil Brown reported that Anglo-Saxon huts were being destroyed by gravel-working on property belonging to the Bury St. Edmunds Corporation's sewage farm and I subsequently recorded three of the huts. In later years Miss Vera Evison of Birkbeck College, London, investigated the N. edge of the site and established that a considerable area of settlement still existed.z The designation of the whole area for use as the Corporation's rubbish-tip provided the opportunity for the entire site to be examined by the Ministry of Public Building and Works in 1965.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1969 Society for Medieval Archaeology
ISSN
1745-817X
eISSN
0076-6097
DOI
10.1080/00766097.1969.11735313
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IN THE early 1850s a pagan Saxon cemetery was discovered on West Stow Heath by men ‘raising gravel for b alias f for barges operating on the River Lark. The site was explored by several local antiquaries and the spoils divided, some eventually reaching the Moyse's Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds, and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. The report on these discoveries which was published1 does not give their precise location; the evidence suggests the possibility of two cemeteries. The site of the settlement was never looked for and remained undisturbed only a few hundred yards away on the N. bank of the Lark.In 1947 Mr. Basil Brown reported that Anglo-Saxon huts were being destroyed by gravel-working on property belonging to the Bury St. Edmunds Corporation's sewage farm and I subsequently recorded three of the huts. In later years Miss Vera Evison of Birkbeck College, London, investigated the N. edge of the site and established that a considerable area of settlement still existed.z The designation of the whole area for use as the Corporation's rubbish-tip provided the opportunity for the entire site to be examined by the Ministry of Public Building and Works in 1965.

Journal

Medieval ArchaeologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1969

There are no references for this article.