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The Conflict between Education and Female Labour in Turkey: Understanding Turkey’s Non-compliance with the U-shape Hypothesis

The Conflict between Education and Female Labour in Turkey: Understanding Turkey’s Non-compliance... AbstractFemale labour force participation rates (FLFPRs) are known to be exceptionally low in Turkey by international standards. The general consensus is that the catalyst behind FLFPRs is the level of educational attainment. In the academic literature, the relationship between the two factors—education and female labour force participation—is explained under what is known as the U-shape hypothesis. Although female education has increased over the past years, the U-shape is not observable in Turkey. This research scrutinizes the economic and social characteristics of the labour markets in Turkey and finally seeks to demonstrate how women in Turkey are trapped in a vicious cycle. The U-shape theory is insufficient to explain FLFPRs in Turkey. Turkish women, although well educated, face cultural barriers in entering the labour markets. They present a form of passive human capital, whose skills are underutilized. Thus, the curve remains an L-shape rather than a U. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies Taylor & Francis

The Conflict between Education and Female Labour in Turkey: Understanding Turkey’s Non-compliance with the U-shape Hypothesis

Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies , Volume 19 (5): 19 – Sep 3, 2017

The Conflict between Education and Female Labour in Turkey: Understanding Turkey’s Non-compliance with the U-shape Hypothesis

Abstract

AbstractFemale labour force participation rates (FLFPRs) are known to be exceptionally low in Turkey by international standards. The general consensus is that the catalyst behind FLFPRs is the level of educational attainment. In the academic literature, the relationship between the two factors—education and female labour force participation—is explained under what is known as the U-shape hypothesis. Although female education has increased over the past years, the U-shape is not...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1944-8961
eISSN
1944-8953
DOI
10.1080/19448953.2017.1296262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractFemale labour force participation rates (FLFPRs) are known to be exceptionally low in Turkey by international standards. The general consensus is that the catalyst behind FLFPRs is the level of educational attainment. In the academic literature, the relationship between the two factors—education and female labour force participation—is explained under what is known as the U-shape hypothesis. Although female education has increased over the past years, the U-shape is not observable in Turkey. This research scrutinizes the economic and social characteristics of the labour markets in Turkey and finally seeks to demonstrate how women in Turkey are trapped in a vicious cycle. The U-shape theory is insufficient to explain FLFPRs in Turkey. Turkish women, although well educated, face cultural barriers in entering the labour markets. They present a form of passive human capital, whose skills are underutilized. Thus, the curve remains an L-shape rather than a U.

Journal

Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 3, 2017

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