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The distribution of UK personal income tax compliance costs

The distribution of UK personal income tax compliance costs Governments are committed to reducing the regulatory burden on business and individuals, while at the same time transferring many tasks from bureaucrats. One such example is tax compliance where self-assessment (SA) has raised concerns that such transfers may place a particularly heavy burden on lower income and elderly taxpayers. This is the first study since its introduction into the UK in 1996 of the regulatory burden, which SA imposes on individuals. We identify both the total compliance burden and its components for individuals who might be expected to incur high compliance costs because they pay tax on nonbusiness employment income. We use a specially designed questionnaire and find that within this group the burden seems to have increased by less than 25%. Compliance costs are regressive, but do not impinge disproportionately on the elderly. The compliance burden is determined by income, occupation, education (but not specifically in accounting subjects) and difficulty in attending to tax affairs, indicating some possibilities for reducing these compliance costs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Economics Taylor & Francis

The distribution of UK personal income tax compliance costs

18 pages

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References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4283
eISSN
9999-7004
DOI
10.1080/00036840701604370
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Governments are committed to reducing the regulatory burden on business and individuals, while at the same time transferring many tasks from bureaucrats. One such example is tax compliance where self-assessment (SA) has raised concerns that such transfers may place a particularly heavy burden on lower income and elderly taxpayers. This is the first study since its introduction into the UK in 1996 of the regulatory burden, which SA imposes on individuals. We identify both the total compliance burden and its components for individuals who might be expected to incur high compliance costs because they pay tax on nonbusiness employment income. We use a specially designed questionnaire and find that within this group the burden seems to have increased by less than 25%. Compliance costs are regressive, but do not impinge disproportionately on the elderly. The compliance burden is determined by income, occupation, education (but not specifically in accounting subjects) and difficulty in attending to tax affairs, indicating some possibilities for reducing these compliance costs.

Journal

Applied EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2010

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