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The Drop-Off/Pick-Up Method For Household Survey Research

The Drop-Off/Pick-Up Method For Household Survey Research The hand delivery of self-administered questionnaires has been presented as an alternative for reducing non-coverage error associated with the mail method at lower cost than face-to-face interviews. This research note draws from experiences using the hand delivery technique (combined with hand retrieval) in rural and small community studies to address practical issues associated with improving coverage, and its relationships with sampling, response, and administrative considerations. It is suggested that while this technique provides needed flexibility in relation to household enumeration options, logistical issues limit its applicability where settlement patterns are dispersed and resources to supplement sampling frames are inadequate. Time and cost outlays are required to maximize its potential. When place-related and administrative conditions can be met, the technique offers promise for reducing non-coverage error and possible sample bias without saerificing response rates. In addition, it provides opportunities to gain experiential insights not possible with other survey methods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Community Development Society Taylor & Francis

The Drop-Off/Pick-Up Method For Household Survey Research

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References (19)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
0010-3829
DOI
10.1080/15575330109489680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The hand delivery of self-administered questionnaires has been presented as an alternative for reducing non-coverage error associated with the mail method at lower cost than face-to-face interviews. This research note draws from experiences using the hand delivery technique (combined with hand retrieval) in rural and small community studies to address practical issues associated with improving coverage, and its relationships with sampling, response, and administrative considerations. It is suggested that while this technique provides needed flexibility in relation to household enumeration options, logistical issues limit its applicability where settlement patterns are dispersed and resources to supplement sampling frames are inadequate. Time and cost outlays are required to maximize its potential. When place-related and administrative conditions can be met, the technique offers promise for reducing non-coverage error and possible sample bias without saerificing response rates. In addition, it provides opportunities to gain experiential insights not possible with other survey methods.

Journal

Journal of the Community Development SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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