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The influence of television suicide in a normal adolescent population

The influence of television suicide in a normal adolescent population Abstract This cross-sectional study investigated the possible impact of exposure to television suicide on normal adolescents. Students (mean age 14.2 years) from 3 high schools completed a questionnaire on television habits, common television life events, the Youth Self-Report, the Brief Adolescent Risk-Taking Scale and a brief Substance Use Scale. Students claiming more than two exposures to television suicide took more risks and substances, watched more videos, denied being upset by television, had a history of suicide attempts, knew more of suicide in the community, and had higher depression scores. In those who reported knowing someone who had died from suicide, frequent exposure to suicide on television appeared to contribute to the variance of suicide attempts. In contrast, it contributed little to either depression or suicidal thoughts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Suicide Research Taylor & Francis

The influence of television suicide in a normal adolescent population

Archives of Suicide Research , Volume 2 (2): 15 – Apr 1, 1996

The influence of television suicide in a normal adolescent population

Abstract

Abstract This cross-sectional study investigated the possible impact of exposure to television suicide on normal adolescents. Students (mean age 14.2 years) from 3 high schools completed a questionnaire on television habits, common television life events, the Youth Self-Report, the Brief Adolescent Risk-Taking Scale and a brief Substance Use Scale. Students claiming more than two exposures to television suicide took more risks and substances, watched more videos, denied being upset by...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1543-6136
eISSN
1381-1118
DOI
10.1080/13811119608251960
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This cross-sectional study investigated the possible impact of exposure to television suicide on normal adolescents. Students (mean age 14.2 years) from 3 high schools completed a questionnaire on television habits, common television life events, the Youth Self-Report, the Brief Adolescent Risk-Taking Scale and a brief Substance Use Scale. Students claiming more than two exposures to television suicide took more risks and substances, watched more videos, denied being upset by television, had a history of suicide attempts, knew more of suicide in the community, and had higher depression scores. In those who reported knowing someone who had died from suicide, frequent exposure to suicide on television appeared to contribute to the variance of suicide attempts. In contrast, it contributed little to either depression or suicidal thoughts.

Journal

Archives of Suicide ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 1996

Keywords: adolescent; suicidal behaviours; television; influence

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