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The International Relations of the Persian Gulf

The International Relations of the Persian Gulf 242 Book Reviews down the major conceptual contribution of the book and at worst leaves the reader puzzled about the primary dynamics that drove Italy’s policy toward Arabia at this pivotal moment. GREGORY GAUSE III, The International Relations of the Persian Gulf (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 270 pages; £55.00 hardback, £18.99 paperback. Reviewed by ZIBA MOSHAVER, London Middle East Institute, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, United Kingdom, zm@clara.net. The Persian Gulf as we know it today took its present political shape only in 1971, when the British left the region. That year was a turning point, as Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, and the United Arab Emirate became independent; Kuwait had gained its independence only a decade earlier. This change created a radically different geopolitical and strategic configuration, both for the neighbouring larger states of Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia and for an energy-dependent world, especially the industrialised West. The oil crisis of the early 1970s brought the region to new heights of interest and complexity. In The International Relations of the Persian Gulf, Gregory Gause offers the first systematic, informative, and dispassionate study of the region between 1971 and 2008. The volume explores a range of themes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Arabian Studies Taylor & Francis

The International Relations of the Persian Gulf

Journal of Arabian Studies , Volume 2 (2): 2 – Dec 1, 2012
2 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2153-4780
eISSN
2153-4764
DOI
10.1080/21534764.2012.735465
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

242 Book Reviews down the major conceptual contribution of the book and at worst leaves the reader puzzled about the primary dynamics that drove Italy’s policy toward Arabia at this pivotal moment. GREGORY GAUSE III, The International Relations of the Persian Gulf (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 270 pages; £55.00 hardback, £18.99 paperback. Reviewed by ZIBA MOSHAVER, London Middle East Institute, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, United Kingdom, zm@clara.net. The Persian Gulf as we know it today took its present political shape only in 1971, when the British left the region. That year was a turning point, as Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, and the United Arab Emirate became independent; Kuwait had gained its independence only a decade earlier. This change created a radically different geopolitical and strategic configuration, both for the neighbouring larger states of Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia and for an energy-dependent world, especially the industrialised West. The oil crisis of the early 1970s brought the region to new heights of interest and complexity. In The International Relations of the Persian Gulf, Gregory Gause offers the first systematic, informative, and dispassionate study of the region between 1971 and 2008. The volume explores a range of themes

Journal

Journal of Arabian StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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