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The limits of environmentalism without class: Lessons from the ancient forest struggle of the pacific Northwest*

The limits of environmentalism without class: Lessons from the ancient forest struggle of the... The Limits of Environmentalism Without Class: Lessons from the Ancient Forest Struggle of the Pacific Northwest* By John Bellamy Foster 1. Introduction Many prominent environmentalists today have adopted a political stance that sets them and the movement that they profess to represent above and beyond the class struggle. For example, Jonathon Porritt, the British Green leader, has declared that the rise of the German Greens marks the demise of "the redundant polemic of class warfare and the mythical immutability of a left/right divide."1 According to this outlook, both the working class and capitalist class are to blame for the global environmental crisis (insofar as it can be traced to capitalist rather than socialist modes of production), while the greens represent a "new paradigm" derived from nature's own values, one that transcends the historic class problem. By removing themselves in this way from the classic social debate, these green thinkers implicitly embrace the dominant "we have seen the enemy, and it is us" view that traces most environmental problems to the buying habits of consumers, the number of babies born, and the characteristics of industrialization, as if there were no class or other divisions in society. *The author would like http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Capitalism Nature Socialism Taylor & Francis

The limits of environmentalism without class: Lessons from the ancient forest struggle of the pacific Northwest*

Capitalism Nature Socialism , Volume 4 (1): 31 – Mar 1, 1993

The limits of environmentalism without class: Lessons from the ancient forest struggle of the pacific Northwest*

Capitalism Nature Socialism , Volume 4 (1): 31 – Mar 1, 1993

Abstract

The Limits of Environmentalism Without Class: Lessons from the Ancient Forest Struggle of the Pacific Northwest* By John Bellamy Foster 1. Introduction Many prominent environmentalists today have adopted a political stance that sets them and the movement that they profess to represent above and beyond the class struggle. For example, Jonathon Porritt, the British Green leader, has declared that the rise of the German Greens marks the demise of "the redundant polemic of class warfare and the mythical immutability of a left/right divide."1 According to this outlook, both the working class and capitalist class are to blame for the global environmental crisis (insofar as it can be traced to capitalist rather than socialist modes of production), while the greens represent a "new paradigm" derived from nature's own values, one that transcends the historic class problem. By removing themselves in this way from the classic social debate, these green thinkers implicitly embrace the dominant "we have seen the enemy, and it is us" view that traces most environmental problems to the buying habits of consumers, the number of babies born, and the characteristics of industrialization, as if there were no class or other divisions in society. *The author would like

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1548-3290
eISSN
1045-5752
DOI
10.1080/10455759309358529
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Limits of Environmentalism Without Class: Lessons from the Ancient Forest Struggle of the Pacific Northwest* By John Bellamy Foster 1. Introduction Many prominent environmentalists today have adopted a political stance that sets them and the movement that they profess to represent above and beyond the class struggle. For example, Jonathon Porritt, the British Green leader, has declared that the rise of the German Greens marks the demise of "the redundant polemic of class warfare and the mythical immutability of a left/right divide."1 According to this outlook, both the working class and capitalist class are to blame for the global environmental crisis (insofar as it can be traced to capitalist rather than socialist modes of production), while the greens represent a "new paradigm" derived from nature's own values, one that transcends the historic class problem. By removing themselves in this way from the classic social debate, these green thinkers implicitly embrace the dominant "we have seen the enemy, and it is us" view that traces most environmental problems to the buying habits of consumers, the number of babies born, and the characteristics of industrialization, as if there were no class or other divisions in society. *The author would like

Journal

Capitalism Nature SocialismTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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