Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The mobility of thought: Reflections on Blanchot and Benjamin

The mobility of thought: Reflections on Blanchot and Benjamin The figure of the secularized Jew speaks of the migrant’s tale, the exile’s story, as it confirms the fragile calculations of a modern consciousness. Separated from the ‘true life’ of the nation-state and caught up in a wider itinerary of unstable movement,Judaic theologyoffers a perspective denied by the Western philosophic tradition: namely, of identity cast outside the sedentary, of travel structured not by nostosbut byan originary condition of the open and incomplete.This essay considers the relation between spatial displacement and the dynamics of critical thought. It asks: how may life ‘beyond the city walls’ be seenless as the historical or sociological ‘fate’ of Judaic thought,than as the enabling presupposition of its critique? What is specificabout a Judaic traditionthat illuminatesthe shared ontology of geography, philosophy, and the mobile subject? In exploring these questions this essay stages a dialogue betweenMaurice Blanchot and Walter Benjamin. Looking specifically at Blanchot’s interpretation of an exilic desertand at Benjamin’sconception ofthe modern city,I argue that both recallcertain key themes in a Judaic theology which not only contest the spatial and temporal imperatives of Empire but which refer, more generally, to structures of critical thought itself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies Taylor & Francis

The mobility of thought: Reflections on Blanchot and Benjamin

13 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-mobility-of-thought-reflections-on-blanchot-and-benjamin-BOC7THccPl

References (25)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-929X
eISSN
1369-801X
DOI
10.1080/1369801042000238346
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The figure of the secularized Jew speaks of the migrant’s tale, the exile’s story, as it confirms the fragile calculations of a modern consciousness. Separated from the ‘true life’ of the nation-state and caught up in a wider itinerary of unstable movement,Judaic theologyoffers a perspective denied by the Western philosophic tradition: namely, of identity cast outside the sedentary, of travel structured not by nostosbut byan originary condition of the open and incomplete.This essay considers the relation between spatial displacement and the dynamics of critical thought. It asks: how may life ‘beyond the city walls’ be seenless as the historical or sociological ‘fate’ of Judaic thought,than as the enabling presupposition of its critique? What is specificabout a Judaic traditionthat illuminatesthe shared ontology of geography, philosophy, and the mobile subject? In exploring these questions this essay stages a dialogue betweenMaurice Blanchot and Walter Benjamin. Looking specifically at Blanchot’s interpretation of an exilic desertand at Benjamin’sconception ofthe modern city,I argue that both recallcertain key themes in a Judaic theology which not only contest the spatial and temporal imperatives of Empire but which refer, more generally, to structures of critical thought itself.

Journal

Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2004

Keywords: Enlightenment; Judaism; originary separation; anti-imperialism; geography; materialist dialectic

There are no references for this article.