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The Need and Theoretical Basis for Exploring Wildlife Value Orientations Cross-Culturally

The Need and Theoretical Basis for Exploring Wildlife Value Orientations Cross-Culturally Research in the United States suggests wildlife value orientations are changing as part of a broader shift in values. Specifically, a shift from materialist to post-materialist values occurring with modernization is linked to a rise in mutualism orientations, viewing wildlife as capable of relationships of trust with humans and as deserving of rights and caring. Although it is conceivable that growth in mutualism is a global phenomenon, little is known on a worldwide scale about the cognitive basis for human–wildlife relationships. The purpose of the investigation summarized throughout this special issue was to contribute to the need for research in this area by exploring wildlife value orientations across cultures. We began our investigation by asking whether mutualism could be detected as an orientation in societies outside the United States and by developing a method for cross-cultural value orientation assessment. Here we summarize the purpose and theoretical approach to this investigation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Dimensions of Wildlife Taylor & Francis

The Need and Theoretical Basis for Exploring Wildlife Value Orientations Cross-Culturally

10 pages

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References (22)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1533-158X
eISSN
1087-1209
DOI
10.1080/10871200701555857
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research in the United States suggests wildlife value orientations are changing as part of a broader shift in values. Specifically, a shift from materialist to post-materialist values occurring with modernization is linked to a rise in mutualism orientations, viewing wildlife as capable of relationships of trust with humans and as deserving of rights and caring. Although it is conceivable that growth in mutualism is a global phenomenon, little is known on a worldwide scale about the cognitive basis for human–wildlife relationships. The purpose of the investigation summarized throughout this special issue was to contribute to the need for research in this area by exploring wildlife value orientations across cultures. We began our investigation by asking whether mutualism could be detected as an orientation in societies outside the United States and by developing a method for cross-cultural value orientation assessment. Here we summarize the purpose and theoretical approach to this investigation.

Journal

Human Dimensions of WildlifeTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 17, 2007

Keywords: culture; human–wildlife conflict; values; value orientations; wildlife values

There are no references for this article.