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The “New Environmental Paradigm”

The “New Environmental Paradigm” A Proposed Measuring Instrument and Preliminary Results 1 THE "NEW ENVIRONMENTAl PARADIGM" RILEY E. DUNLAP AND KENT D. VANLIERE Numerous writers have argued that our nation's ecological problems stem in large part from the traditional values, attitudes and beliefs prevalent within our society (e.g., Disch, 1970). For example, it is often suggested that our belief in abundance and prog­ ress, our devotion to growth and prosperity, our faith in science and technology, and our commitment to a laissez-faire economy, limited governmental planning and private property rights all contribute to environmental degradation and/or hinder efforts to im­ prove the quality of the environment (see, e.g., Caldwell, 1970; Campbell and Wade, 1972; Dunlap, 1976; Whisenhunt, 1974). Pirages and Ehrlich (1974:43-44) have argued that such a constellation of values, attitudes and beliefs comprises our society's "Domi­ nant Social Paradigm" (or DSP). A DSP constitutes a world view "through which indi­ viduals or, collectively, a society interpret the meaning of the external world .. . [and] ... a mental image of social reality that guides expectations in a society." Not surpris­ ingly, they further argue that our society's fundamentally anti-ecological DSP must be replaced by a more realistic world view if ecological catastrophe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Environmental Education Online Taylor & Francis

The “New Environmental Paradigm”

The “New Environmental Paradigm”

The Journal of Environmental Education Online , Volume 9 (4): 10 – Jul 1, 1978

Abstract

A Proposed Measuring Instrument and Preliminary Results 1 THE "NEW ENVIRONMENTAl PARADIGM" RILEY E. DUNLAP AND KENT D. VANLIERE Numerous writers have argued that our nation's ecological problems stem in large part from the traditional values, attitudes and beliefs prevalent within our society (e.g., Disch, 1970). For example, it is often suggested that our belief in abundance and prog­ ress, our devotion to growth and prosperity, our faith in science and technology, and our commitment to a laissez-faire economy, limited governmental planning and private property rights all contribute to environmental degradation and/or hinder efforts to im­ prove the quality of the environment (see, e.g., Caldwell, 1970; Campbell and Wade, 1972; Dunlap, 1976; Whisenhunt, 1974). Pirages and Ehrlich (1974:43-44) have argued that such a constellation of values, attitudes and beliefs comprises our society's "Domi­ nant Social Paradigm" (or DSP). A DSP constitutes a world view "through which indi­ viduals or, collectively, a society interpret the meaning of the external world .. . [and] ... a mental image of social reality that guides expectations in a society." Not surpris­ ingly, they further argue that our society's fundamentally anti-ecological DSP must be replaced by a more realistic world view if ecological catastrophe

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1940-1892
eISSN
0095-8964
DOI
10.1080/00958964.1978.10801875
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Proposed Measuring Instrument and Preliminary Results 1 THE "NEW ENVIRONMENTAl PARADIGM" RILEY E. DUNLAP AND KENT D. VANLIERE Numerous writers have argued that our nation's ecological problems stem in large part from the traditional values, attitudes and beliefs prevalent within our society (e.g., Disch, 1970). For example, it is often suggested that our belief in abundance and prog­ ress, our devotion to growth and prosperity, our faith in science and technology, and our commitment to a laissez-faire economy, limited governmental planning and private property rights all contribute to environmental degradation and/or hinder efforts to im­ prove the quality of the environment (see, e.g., Caldwell, 1970; Campbell and Wade, 1972; Dunlap, 1976; Whisenhunt, 1974). Pirages and Ehrlich (1974:43-44) have argued that such a constellation of values, attitudes and beliefs comprises our society's "Domi­ nant Social Paradigm" (or DSP). A DSP constitutes a world view "through which indi­ viduals or, collectively, a society interpret the meaning of the external world .. . [and] ... a mental image of social reality that guides expectations in a society." Not surpris­ ingly, they further argue that our society's fundamentally anti-ecological DSP must be replaced by a more realistic world view if ecological catastrophe

Journal

The Journal of Environmental Education OnlineTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1978

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